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Abstract

An African-American student named Jamal adopts the nickname “Jay” when he runs for the student government association. A transgender sophomore dresses impeccably in suits and ties, even for biology lab. Yoshino (2006) described these actions as covering, where an individual masks one’s own recognized marginalized identity in order to gain acceptance within the dominant identity. The authors— a gay African-American and a heterosexual Latino— are both male student affairs professionals at predominately White institutions (PWIs). They will each look at the subtle and covert ways student affairs professionals reproduce pressures to cover and offer ways to understand the impact of conforming to the majority culture.