Date of Publication

2021

Faculty Mentor

Sarah Vose, PhD

Abstract

Objectives. To quantify the complex relationships shared between numerous risk factors associated with suicide among Vermont decedents.

Methods. Vermont Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS) data from 2015-2019 were examined through binary logistic regression analyses to examine demographic variables’ ability to predict death by suicide.

Results. In the analysis of 26,738 deaths, significant predictors of suicide among the 535 suicide decedents included rurality (odds ratio [OR] = 1.043; 95% CI = 1.016, 1.071; P = 0.002), divorce (OR = 1.785; 95% CI = 1,396, 2.281; P < 0.001), and higher educational attainment including associate degree (OR = 1.472; 95% CI = 1.033, 2.098; P = 0.032), bachelor’s degree (OR = 1.686; 95% CI = 1.266, 2.247; P < 0.001), master’s degree (OR = 1.812; 95% CI = 1.162, 2.826; P = 0.009), or doctorate or professional degree (OR = 3.345; 95% CI = 1.979, 5.651; P < 0.001).

Conclusions. Certain Vermont-specific results contradict previous studies. Future investigations may focus on how generalizable our results are to other populations or why sex-specific differences exist for some demographic variables.

Public Health Implications. These risk factors may inform targeted clinical screening for mental health and suicide in Vermont.

Document Type

Dissertation/Thesis

Available for download on Friday, May 05, 2023

Included in

Public Health Commons

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