Authors

Pramod K. Aggarwal, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)
Andy Jarvis, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Bruce M. Campbell, Københavns Universitet
Robert B. Zougmoré, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics Mali
Arun Khatri-Chhetri, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)
Sonja J. Vermeulen, Hoffmann Centre for Sustainable Resource Economy
Ana Maria Loboguerrero, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Leocadio S. Sebastian, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)
James Kinyangi, International Livestock Research Institute Nairobi
Osana Bonilla-Findji, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Maren Radeny, International Livestock Research Institute Nairobi
John Recha, International Livestock Research Institute Nairobi
Deissy Martinez-Baron, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Julian Ramirez-Villegas, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Sophia Huyer, Women in Global Science and Technology (WISAT)
Philip Thornton, International Livestock Research Institute Nairobi
Eva Wollenberg, University of Vermont
James Hansen, International Research Institute for Climate and Society
Patricia Alvarez-Toro, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Andrés Aguilar-Ariza, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
David Arango-Londoño, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Victor Patiño-Bravo, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Ovidio Rivera, Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical
Mathieu Ouedraogo, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics Mali
Bui Tan Yen, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2018

Abstract

Increasing weather risks threaten agricultural production systems and food security across the world. Maintaining agricultural growth while minimizing climate shocks is crucial to building a resilient food production system and meeting developmental goals in vulnerable countries. Experts have proposed several technological, institutional, and policy interventions to help farmers adapt to current and future weather variability and to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper presents the climate-smart village (CSV) approach as a means of performing agricultural research for development that robustly tests technological and institutional options for dealing with climatic variability and climate change in agriculture using participatory methods. It aims to scale up and scale out the appropriate options and draw out lessons for policy makers from local to global levels. The approach incorporates evaluation of climate-smart technologies, practices, services, and processes relevant to local climatic risk management and identifies opportunities for maximizing adaptation gains from synergies across different interventions and recognizing potential maladaptation and trade-offs. It ensures that these are aligned with local knowledge and link into development plans. This paper describes early results in Asia, Africa, and Latin America to illustrate different examples of the CSV approach in diverse agroecological settings. Results from initial studies indicate that the CSV approach has a high potential for scaling out promising climate-smart agricultural technologies, practices, and services. Climate analog studies indicate that the lessons learned at the CSV sites would be relevant to adaptation planning in a large part of global agricultural land even under scenarios of climate change. Key barriers and opportunities for further work are also discussed.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Rights Information

© 2018 by the author(s).

DOI

10.5751/ES-09844-230114

Link to Article at Publisher Website

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