Presenter's Name(s)

Danielle A. KolliopoulosFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

emmett.whitaker@uvmhealth.edu

Project Collaborators

Emily Sola (Collaborating Mentor)

Secondary Mentor NetID

esola

Secondary Mentor Name

Emily Sola

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biology

Second Program (optional)

Psychological Science

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Secondary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Presentation Title

Development of Clinically-Relevant Piglet Model for the Study of Impact of Surgery on the Developing Brain

Time

3:00 PM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Health Sciences

Abstract

Introduction

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently requires safety labels on widely used anesthetics warning that these drugs may negatively impact the development of the brains of children under 3 years old. Though the deleterious effects of anesthesia on the brain in development have been well established, the impact of surgical stress remains unclear. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible model of major surgical stress in a translational animal model. Our laboratory has previously established a model of neonatal anesthesia in the neonatal piglet. With a veterinary surgeon, we created a model of major surgical stress that can assess the effects both acutely and longer-term.

Methods

Three piglets, aged 2-5 days, were anesthetized with 8% sevoflurane in 100% O2. Animal vitals were monitored at all times. After sterile preparation, a 2cm incision was made on the lateral aspect of the hind leg. Cefazolin (25 mg/kg) was administered to prevent infection. A bone saw was used to cut perpendicularly and separate the femur (femoral osteotomy). The osteotomy was then repaired using a titanium plate and screws. Bupivacaine was administered for pain control. Buprenorphine was also administered prior to awakening for postoperative pain. During the 48-hour recovery period, each piglet was given meloxicam twice a day with buprenorphine if needed. After recovery, radiographs were taken to assess the repair.

Results

All 3 animals were weight bearing within minutes of emerging from anesthesia and did not show signs of discomfort within the recovery period. Imaging assessment revealed stable repair of the osteotomy.

Conclusion

These data demonstrate that our piglet femoral osteotomy model is an appropriately safe and reproducible model of major surgical stress in the neonate. Future studies will focus on determining the effects of surgical stress on the developing brain and subsequent neurocognitive function.

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Development of Clinically-Relevant Piglet Model for the Study of Impact of Surgery on the Developing Brain

Introduction

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently requires safety labels on widely used anesthetics warning that these drugs may negatively impact the development of the brains of children under 3 years old. Though the deleterious effects of anesthesia on the brain in development have been well established, the impact of surgical stress remains unclear. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible model of major surgical stress in a translational animal model. Our laboratory has previously established a model of neonatal anesthesia in the neonatal piglet. With a veterinary surgeon, we created a model of major surgical stress that can assess the effects both acutely and longer-term.

Methods

Three piglets, aged 2-5 days, were anesthetized with 8% sevoflurane in 100% O2. Animal vitals were monitored at all times. After sterile preparation, a 2cm incision was made on the lateral aspect of the hind leg. Cefazolin (25 mg/kg) was administered to prevent infection. A bone saw was used to cut perpendicularly and separate the femur (femoral osteotomy). The osteotomy was then repaired using a titanium plate and screws. Bupivacaine was administered for pain control. Buprenorphine was also administered prior to awakening for postoperative pain. During the 48-hour recovery period, each piglet was given meloxicam twice a day with buprenorphine if needed. After recovery, radiographs were taken to assess the repair.

Results

All 3 animals were weight bearing within minutes of emerging from anesthesia and did not show signs of discomfort within the recovery period. Imaging assessment revealed stable repair of the osteotomy.

Conclusion

These data demonstrate that our piglet femoral osteotomy model is an appropriately safe and reproducible model of major surgical stress in the neonate. Future studies will focus on determining the effects of surgical stress on the developing brain and subsequent neurocognitive function.