Presentation Title

Clinical Effectiveness of Dry Needling on Pain & Function in the Lower Extremity: A Systematic Literature Review

Project Collaborators

Nancy Bianchi (Dana Medical Library)

Time

3:20 PM

Location

Mildred Livak Ballroom

Abstract

Background & Objectives:

Musculoskeletal (MSK) health conditions are one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. Conventional approaches for addressing MSK pain such as therapeutic exercise, patient education, and pharmacological management often have mixed results. Dry needling is an alternative intervention that may be included in a treatment plan when myofascial trigger points (MFTPs) are present. Research to date supports the effectiveness of dry needling in the upper extremity, but evidence is lacking for the lower extremity and current research uses data from dated studies. Therefore, the objective of this review was to analyze the most current research and determine the clinical effectiveness of dry needling on MSK conditions in the lower extremity.

Methods:

Articles were retrieved from electronic databases using a search strategy informed by our research question. The articles satisfying the predefined eligibility criteria were selected for the review. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and data such as study characteristics and key findings were extracted. Recommendations were made based on a preponderance of evidence and assigned a grade using the OCEBM Grades of Recommendation.

Results:

A total of 97 articles were retrieved and after duplicates were removed, 75 articles remained. Upon review of the abstracts, 65 articles were excluded because they did not satisfy the eligibility criteria. Of the 10 articles included in the full-text review, 9 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria and have moved on to the critical appraisal.

Implications:

This systematic review will aim to identify whether patients with lower extremity MSK conditions will have reductions in pain and/or increases in function following dry needling. The results of the study will assist clinician decision making in identifying lower extremity MSK conditions that may benefit from the use of dry needling.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Reuben S. Escorpizo

Secondary Mentor NetID

shenry

Secondary Mentor Name

Sharon Henry

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Physical Therapy

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Clinical Effectiveness of Dry Needling on Pain & Function in the Lower Extremity: A Systematic Literature Review

Background & Objectives:

Musculoskeletal (MSK) health conditions are one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. Conventional approaches for addressing MSK pain such as therapeutic exercise, patient education, and pharmacological management often have mixed results. Dry needling is an alternative intervention that may be included in a treatment plan when myofascial trigger points (MFTPs) are present. Research to date supports the effectiveness of dry needling in the upper extremity, but evidence is lacking for the lower extremity and current research uses data from dated studies. Therefore, the objective of this review was to analyze the most current research and determine the clinical effectiveness of dry needling on MSK conditions in the lower extremity.

Methods:

Articles were retrieved from electronic databases using a search strategy informed by our research question. The articles satisfying the predefined eligibility criteria were selected for the review. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and data such as study characteristics and key findings were extracted. Recommendations were made based on a preponderance of evidence and assigned a grade using the OCEBM Grades of Recommendation.

Results:

A total of 97 articles were retrieved and after duplicates were removed, 75 articles remained. Upon review of the abstracts, 65 articles were excluded because they did not satisfy the eligibility criteria. Of the 10 articles included in the full-text review, 9 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria and have moved on to the critical appraisal.

Implications:

This systematic review will aim to identify whether patients with lower extremity MSK conditions will have reductions in pain and/or increases in function following dry needling. The results of the study will assist clinician decision making in identifying lower extremity MSK conditions that may benefit from the use of dry needling.