Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Reuben S. Escorpizo

Project Collaborators

Nancy Bianchi (Dana Medical Library)

Secondary Mentor NetID

shenry

Secondary Mentor Name

Sharon Henry

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Physical Therapy

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Presentation Title

Prognostic factors for treatment outcomes following dry needling intervention: a systematic literature review

Time

3:20 PM

Location

Mildred Livak Ballroom

Abstract

Background & Objectives

Musculoskeletal (MSK) health conditions are the leading cause of disability in the United States. Conventional approaches for addressing MSK pain include therapeutic exercise, patient education, and pharmacological management. However, MSK issues often remain unresolved in the long-term. Dry needling is an alternative intervention within the physical therapy scope of practice that may be included in a treatment plan when myofascial trigger points (MFTPs) are present. Studies investigating the effectiveness of dry needling have found inconclusive results, suggesting that there may be prognostic factors influencing the extent to which a person will benefit from dry needling. Knowledge of these factors may lead to improved accuracy in predicting which patients will have successful outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify prognostic factors in patients treated with dry needling.

Methods

Articles were retrieved from electronic databases using a search strategy informed by our research question. Following the literature search, articles were screened using established eligibility criteria. The methodological quality of all studies in this systematic review will be assessed using the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) Levels of Evidence. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale, while observational studies assessed with the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Data extraction will be performed on selected studies. Recommendations will be made based on a preponderance of evidence and assigned a grade using the OCEBM Grades of Recommendation.

Results

A total of 302 articles were retrieved through database searching. After duplicates were removed, 195 articles remained. Upon review of the abstracts, 104 articles were excluded because they did not satisfy the eligibility criteria. Of the 91 articles included in the full-text review, 52 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria and will move on to the critical appraisal.

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Prognostic factors for treatment outcomes following dry needling intervention: a systematic literature review

Background & Objectives

Musculoskeletal (MSK) health conditions are the leading cause of disability in the United States. Conventional approaches for addressing MSK pain include therapeutic exercise, patient education, and pharmacological management. However, MSK issues often remain unresolved in the long-term. Dry needling is an alternative intervention within the physical therapy scope of practice that may be included in a treatment plan when myofascial trigger points (MFTPs) are present. Studies investigating the effectiveness of dry needling have found inconclusive results, suggesting that there may be prognostic factors influencing the extent to which a person will benefit from dry needling. Knowledge of these factors may lead to improved accuracy in predicting which patients will have successful outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to identify prognostic factors in patients treated with dry needling.

Methods

Articles were retrieved from electronic databases using a search strategy informed by our research question. Following the literature search, articles were screened using established eligibility criteria. The methodological quality of all studies in this systematic review will be assessed using the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) Levels of Evidence. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale, while observational studies assessed with the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Data extraction will be performed on selected studies. Recommendations will be made based on a preponderance of evidence and assigned a grade using the OCEBM Grades of Recommendation.

Results

A total of 302 articles were retrieved through database searching. After duplicates were removed, 195 articles remained. Upon review of the abstracts, 104 articles were excluded because they did not satisfy the eligibility criteria. Of the 91 articles included in the full-text review, 52 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria and will move on to the critical appraisal.