Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Amber Lynn Doiron

Project Collaborators

"Kenneth Skorenko (Collaborating Mentor)", "William Bernier (Collaborating Mentor)", "Wayne Jones (Collaborating Mentor)"

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Program/Major

Bioengineering

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

Presentation Title

Dye- Linked Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy

Time

9:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Engineering & Physical Sciences

Abstract

New dye- linked zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles hold potential as photosensitizers for biomedical applications due to their thermal- and photo stability. The sonication time needed to disperse the particles in water was found to be 6 hours, which yielded particles of approximately 240 nm in diameter. Lower concentrations (10, 20, and 30 μg/mL) of these particles showed minimal effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) viability but the viability decreased at higher concentrations, suggesting the need for particle surface modification. Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) was adsorbed to the surface to increase the biocompatibility of the particles. Electron microscopy suggested that these particles were spherical, while an increase in particle size after addition of PEG was shown by dynamic light scattering. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of PEG on particles after dialysis. Cell viability remained unchanged until a high particle concentration of 100 μg/mL for the coated nanoparticles as compared to 50 μg/mL for the uncoated nanoparticles. An enhancement in cell viability was observed on exposure of PEG-coated dye-linked ZnO particles compared to non-surface modified particles. Dark field microscopy showed reduction in accumulation of PEG-coated nanoparticles compared to uncoated particles. On illumination with NIR source, the Reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays showed concentration dependent increase in ROS level and a two to three degree Celsius temperature change. The present study has shown that there is potential for biological application of the dye-linked ZnO nanoparticles.

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Dye- Linked Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy

New dye- linked zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles hold potential as photosensitizers for biomedical applications due to their thermal- and photo stability. The sonication time needed to disperse the particles in water was found to be 6 hours, which yielded particles of approximately 240 nm in diameter. Lower concentrations (10, 20, and 30 μg/mL) of these particles showed minimal effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) viability but the viability decreased at higher concentrations, suggesting the need for particle surface modification. Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) was adsorbed to the surface to increase the biocompatibility of the particles. Electron microscopy suggested that these particles were spherical, while an increase in particle size after addition of PEG was shown by dynamic light scattering. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of PEG on particles after dialysis. Cell viability remained unchanged until a high particle concentration of 100 μg/mL for the coated nanoparticles as compared to 50 μg/mL for the uncoated nanoparticles. An enhancement in cell viability was observed on exposure of PEG-coated dye-linked ZnO particles compared to non-surface modified particles. Dark field microscopy showed reduction in accumulation of PEG-coated nanoparticles compared to uncoated particles. On illumination with NIR source, the Reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays showed concentration dependent increase in ROS level and a two to three degree Celsius temperature change. The present study has shown that there is potential for biological application of the dye-linked ZnO nanoparticles.