Presentation Title

Falls and Risk for Malnutrition among Older Adults Residing in a Rural State

Presenter's Name(s)

Mariana WingoodFollow

Time

9:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Health Sciences

Abstract

Vermont continues to have one of the nation’s highest fall rates and its rurality may be a contributing factor. The purpose of our study was to compare fall history and nutritional risk (a fall risk factor also associated with rurality) in participants from rural and metropolitan areas. We collected data at statewide community-based fall risk screenings. During the events, nutritional data was collected using the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Screening Tool Questionnaire. We used descriptive statistics (chi2) to examine the relationship between fall history, nutritional risk, and rurality. From 123 subjects, 67% were classified as rural residents. There was no relationship between fall history and nutritional risk (p=0.6). Compared to rural residents, a significantly higher percentage of those living in metropolitan areas reported falls (54% versus 35% p=0.05). However, metropolitan residents were not at higher nutritional risk (49% versus 54%, p=0.61). National nutritional risk rates are lacking, but food insecurity is associated with nutritional risk. Our overall reported high nutritional risk (20%) is higher than the prevalence of food insecurity, both nationally (11%) and in Vermont (9%). In conclusion, we did not identify a relationship between fall history and nutritional risk. We did find a higher percentage of metropolitan residents reporting falls. Furthermore, we identified that DETERMINE is a feasible nutritional screening tool to use at fall risk screenings. It can be used to identify community dwelling older adults at nutritional risk, but it may not have the sensitivity to identify an association between nutritional risk and falls.

Objectives:

After attending the poster session individuals will be able to define

1) outcomes of using the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Screening Tool in community-based fall risk screenings.

2) the relationship between falls, nutritional risk, and rurality.

References:

1. Determine Your Nutritional Health. Am Fam Physician. 2007. http://nutritionandaging.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/DetermineNutritionChecklist.pdf.Nash L, Bergin N. Nutritional strategies to reduce falls risk in older people. Nursing Older People (2014+); London. 2018;30(3):20. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nop.2018.e1016

2. Holben DH, Marshall MB. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: food insecurity in the United States. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017;117(12):1991-2002.

3. Singh GK, Daus GP, Allender M, et al. Social Determinants of Health in the United States: Addressing Major Health Inequality Trends for the Nation, 1935-2016. Int J MCH AIDS. 2017;6(2):139-164. doi:10.21106/ijma.236

4. Torres MJ, Féart C, Samieri C, et al. Poor nutritional status is associated with a higher risk of falling and fracture in elderly people living at home in France: the Three-City cohort study. Osteoporos Int. 2015;26(8):2157-2164. doi:10.1007/s00198-015-3121-2

5. Vermont Department of Health PHS. Vermont Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2016 Data Summary. 2017:72.

6. Ziliak J, Gundersen C. The State of Senior Hunger in America 2016: An Annual Report. Feeding America and the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger. 2018.

7. Zoltick ES, Sahni S, McLean RR, Quach L, Casey VA, Hannan MT. Dietary protein intake and subsequent falls in older men and women: The Framingham Study. J Nutr Health Aging. 2011;15(2):147-152.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Nancy Gell

Secondary Mentor NetID

etarleto

Secondary Mentor Name

Emily Tarleton

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Human Functioning and Rehabilitation Science

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Falls and Risk for Malnutrition among Older Adults Residing in a Rural State

Vermont continues to have one of the nation’s highest fall rates and its rurality may be a contributing factor. The purpose of our study was to compare fall history and nutritional risk (a fall risk factor also associated with rurality) in participants from rural and metropolitan areas. We collected data at statewide community-based fall risk screenings. During the events, nutritional data was collected using the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Screening Tool Questionnaire. We used descriptive statistics (chi2) to examine the relationship between fall history, nutritional risk, and rurality. From 123 subjects, 67% were classified as rural residents. There was no relationship between fall history and nutritional risk (p=0.6). Compared to rural residents, a significantly higher percentage of those living in metropolitan areas reported falls (54% versus 35% p=0.05). However, metropolitan residents were not at higher nutritional risk (49% versus 54%, p=0.61). National nutritional risk rates are lacking, but food insecurity is associated with nutritional risk. Our overall reported high nutritional risk (20%) is higher than the prevalence of food insecurity, both nationally (11%) and in Vermont (9%). In conclusion, we did not identify a relationship between fall history and nutritional risk. We did find a higher percentage of metropolitan residents reporting falls. Furthermore, we identified that DETERMINE is a feasible nutritional screening tool to use at fall risk screenings. It can be used to identify community dwelling older adults at nutritional risk, but it may not have the sensitivity to identify an association between nutritional risk and falls.

Objectives:

After attending the poster session individuals will be able to define

1) outcomes of using the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Screening Tool in community-based fall risk screenings.

2) the relationship between falls, nutritional risk, and rurality.

References:

1. Determine Your Nutritional Health. Am Fam Physician. 2007. http://nutritionandaging.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/DetermineNutritionChecklist.pdf.Nash L, Bergin N. Nutritional strategies to reduce falls risk in older people. Nursing Older People (2014+); London. 2018;30(3):20. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nop.2018.e1016

2. Holben DH, Marshall MB. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: food insecurity in the United States. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017;117(12):1991-2002.

3. Singh GK, Daus GP, Allender M, et al. Social Determinants of Health in the United States: Addressing Major Health Inequality Trends for the Nation, 1935-2016. Int J MCH AIDS. 2017;6(2):139-164. doi:10.21106/ijma.236

4. Torres MJ, Féart C, Samieri C, et al. Poor nutritional status is associated with a higher risk of falling and fracture in elderly people living at home in France: the Three-City cohort study. Osteoporos Int. 2015;26(8):2157-2164. doi:10.1007/s00198-015-3121-2

5. Vermont Department of Health PHS. Vermont Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2016 Data Summary. 2017:72.

6. Ziliak J, Gundersen C. The State of Senior Hunger in America 2016: An Annual Report. Feeding America and the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger. 2018.

7. Zoltick ES, Sahni S, McLean RR, Quach L, Casey VA, Hannan MT. Dietary protein intake and subsequent falls in older men and women: The Framingham Study. J Nutr Health Aging. 2011;15(2):147-152.