Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Ingi Agnarsson

Project Collaborators

Ingi Agnarsson (Faculty Mentor), Lisa Chamberland (Graduate Student Mentor), & Laura Caicedo-Quiroga (Graduate Student Mentor)

Graduate Student Mentors

Lisa Chamberland, Laura Caicedo-Quiroga

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Zoology

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Presentation Title

Exploring the Biogeographic History and Phylogenetic Relationships of Caribbean Spiders in the Genus Eriophora

Time

9:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Biological Sciences

Abstract

The source of the Caribbean’s vast biodiversity has been a hotly researched topic. Until now, these inquiries have been largely vertebrate focused. This study exists as part of Dr. Agnarsson’s expansive arthropod-focused Caribbean Island Biogeography (CarBio) project, and explicitly explores the colonization history and pattern diversity of spiders in the genus Eriophora. This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships of these spiders and tests several hypotheses concerning their mode of dispersal throughout the Caribbean. One such hypothesis tested is the heavily debated GAARlandia land-bridge hypothesis. The CO1 and ITS2 genes of Eriophora specimens were investigated using DNA extractions and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), to produce gene sequences for each specimen. These sequences were then used to synthesize a new statistically supported phylogeny, which fills the holes in our knowledge concerning this group’s history of colonization in the Caribbean.

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Exploring the Biogeographic History and Phylogenetic Relationships of Caribbean Spiders in the Genus Eriophora

The source of the Caribbean’s vast biodiversity has been a hotly researched topic. Until now, these inquiries have been largely vertebrate focused. This study exists as part of Dr. Agnarsson’s expansive arthropod-focused Caribbean Island Biogeography (CarBio) project, and explicitly explores the colonization history and pattern diversity of spiders in the genus Eriophora. This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships of these spiders and tests several hypotheses concerning their mode of dispersal throughout the Caribbean. One such hypothesis tested is the heavily debated GAARlandia land-bridge hypothesis. The CO1 and ITS2 genes of Eriophora specimens were investigated using DNA extractions and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), to produce gene sequences for each specimen. These sequences were then used to synthesize a new statistically supported phylogeny, which fills the holes in our knowledge concerning this group’s history of colonization in the Caribbean.