Presentation Title

Perylene TCNQ Charge Transfer crystal complex for use in organic solar cells

Presenter's Name(s)

Ekraj DahalFollow

Time

9:40 AM

Location

Williams Family Room

Abstract

The ability of electron donor-acceptor molecules in charge transfer (CT) complex to excite electron straight to the acceptor molecule with low energy light make them interesting materials for use in solar cells. In conventional organic solar cells, the CT complex functions as an intermediate step between the exciton dissociation and charge extraction. Our goal is to use the CT complex as the primary method of photogeneration. By bypassing the excition dissociation, we minimize the energy loss and raise the theoretical maximum efficiency. Experimental studies have generated charge-transfer crystals with photon absorptions extending into the near infrared, covering a far wider range of the solar spectrum than previous organic solar cell candidates. The photon flux of solar spectrum is at its highest level near infrared, which helps in larger short circuit current density Jsc. We have studied the perylene and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) CT complex thermally evaporated in a vacuum environment in a ratio of 3:1. Our photovoltaic device functions under infrared and visible illumination, which is direct evidence of excitation of the CT state followed by free carrier generation.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Matthew S. White

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Program/Major

Materials Science

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Perylene TCNQ Charge Transfer crystal complex for use in organic solar cells

The ability of electron donor-acceptor molecules in charge transfer (CT) complex to excite electron straight to the acceptor molecule with low energy light make them interesting materials for use in solar cells. In conventional organic solar cells, the CT complex functions as an intermediate step between the exciton dissociation and charge extraction. Our goal is to use the CT complex as the primary method of photogeneration. By bypassing the excition dissociation, we minimize the energy loss and raise the theoretical maximum efficiency. Experimental studies have generated charge-transfer crystals with photon absorptions extending into the near infrared, covering a far wider range of the solar spectrum than previous organic solar cell candidates. The photon flux of solar spectrum is at its highest level near infrared, which helps in larger short circuit current density Jsc. We have studied the perylene and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) CT complex thermally evaporated in a vacuum environment in a ratio of 3:1. Our photovoltaic device functions under infrared and visible illumination, which is direct evidence of excitation of the CT state followed by free carrier generation.