Presentation Title

Using Pulsed-laser deposition to produce digital-alloy contact layers and characterize the Perovskite solar cell

Project Collaborators

Ben Isenhart (Undergraduate Collaborator), Olivia Sergiovanni (Undergraduate Collaborator), Ekraj Dahal(Graduate Collaborator)

Time

1:00 PM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Engineering & Physical Sciences

Abstract

In this work, we have used pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to produce digital alloy super lattices and gradients of zinc oxide (ZnO) with doped or isovalent-substituted (for band-gap tuning) analogues.Among the PV technologies that rely on oxide contact layers, we consider the organo-metal halide perovskite solar cell to be the most promising and highly dependent on the performance of the oxide layers.We have been able to gain full control of the film deposition parameters. The completed films were characterized optically and electronically to verify the doping efficiency and profile, as well as any band gap variation. By controlling the digital alloys at the nanoscale, we demonstrated their effectiveness as contact layers in perovskite solar cells, with corresponding performance improvement. We have a perovskite cell performance on a digital alloy ZnO contact layer in excess of 18% efficiency.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Matthew White

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Physics

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

Second College (optional)

Grossman School of Business

Second Program (optional)

Entrepreneurship

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Using Pulsed-laser deposition to produce digital-alloy contact layers and characterize the Perovskite solar cell

In this work, we have used pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to produce digital alloy super lattices and gradients of zinc oxide (ZnO) with doped or isovalent-substituted (for band-gap tuning) analogues.Among the PV technologies that rely on oxide contact layers, we consider the organo-metal halide perovskite solar cell to be the most promising and highly dependent on the performance of the oxide layers.We have been able to gain full control of the film deposition parameters. The completed films were characterized optically and electronically to verify the doping efficiency and profile, as well as any band gap variation. By controlling the digital alloys at the nanoscale, we demonstrated their effectiveness as contact layers in perovskite solar cells, with corresponding performance improvement. We have a perovskite cell performance on a digital alloy ZnO contact layer in excess of 18% efficiency.