Presentation Title

Agroecosystems: Crop domestication effects on insect agrobiodiversity

Time

12:10 PM

Location

Mildred Livak Ballroom

Abstract

During thousands of years, humans has been domesticating and cultivating crop plants for useful traits to fulfill our necessities. It is known that these novel characteristics can influence entire arthropod communities; differentiating the ecological and evolutionary processes of higher trophic levels cohabiting agroecosystems compared to natural habitats. Therefore, the study of these new communities can help us to elucidate the origin of agricultural systems and the biotic parameters that contribute to their characteristics and ecological roles. Despite this, only few studies have examined the arthropod community structures on crops and their wild progenitors at the center of crop origin, and no study has been done across multiple crop species. Therefore, here we present a unique approach to understand how do crop domestication and cultivation influences arthropod agrobiodiversity and ecosystem services at an important center of crop origin. We will compare wild progenitors and cultivated crops of maize (Zea mays), squashes (Cucurbita argyrosperma), beans (Phaseolus spp.), chili peppers (Capsicum annuum), and green tomatoes (Physalis philadelphica), distributed around Mexico. For each wild/domesticated complex, we will sample the arthropod agrobiodiversity and collect data regarding other factors that contributes to the structure of the arthropofauna, such as vegetation type, management intensity and plant genotype. In order to rapidly and accurately identify our specimens and assign them to an ecological guild, we will use a metagenomic approach by extracting DNA from a pooled sample and generating barcodes. Abundance and richness will be calculated for each species and guild, and differences among arthropod communities will be determine. In conclusion, our study will help us to understand the community level effects of crop artificial selection and will serve as the base to understand how changes in arthropod population dynamics could structure patterns of genetic diversity and evolution in agroecosystems.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Yolanda H Chen

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Plant and Soil Science

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Secondary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Agroecosystems: Crop domestication effects on insect agrobiodiversity

During thousands of years, humans has been domesticating and cultivating crop plants for useful traits to fulfill our necessities. It is known that these novel characteristics can influence entire arthropod communities; differentiating the ecological and evolutionary processes of higher trophic levels cohabiting agroecosystems compared to natural habitats. Therefore, the study of these new communities can help us to elucidate the origin of agricultural systems and the biotic parameters that contribute to their characteristics and ecological roles. Despite this, only few studies have examined the arthropod community structures on crops and their wild progenitors at the center of crop origin, and no study has been done across multiple crop species. Therefore, here we present a unique approach to understand how do crop domestication and cultivation influences arthropod agrobiodiversity and ecosystem services at an important center of crop origin. We will compare wild progenitors and cultivated crops of maize (Zea mays), squashes (Cucurbita argyrosperma), beans (Phaseolus spp.), chili peppers (Capsicum annuum), and green tomatoes (Physalis philadelphica), distributed around Mexico. For each wild/domesticated complex, we will sample the arthropod agrobiodiversity and collect data regarding other factors that contributes to the structure of the arthropofauna, such as vegetation type, management intensity and plant genotype. In order to rapidly and accurately identify our specimens and assign them to an ecological guild, we will use a metagenomic approach by extracting DNA from a pooled sample and generating barcodes. Abundance and richness will be calculated for each species and guild, and differences among arthropod communities will be determine. In conclusion, our study will help us to understand the community level effects of crop artificial selection and will serve as the base to understand how changes in arthropod population dynamics could structure patterns of genetic diversity and evolution in agroecosystems.