Presenter's Name(s)

Laura Elizabeth HirschFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Robert Gramling

Secondary Mentor NetID

meppstei, drizzo

Secondary Mentor Name

Maggie Eppstein, Donna Rizzo

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Program/Major

Statistics

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Presentation Title

The Effect of the Physical Environment on Palliative Care Conversations

Time

2:00 PM

Location

Chittenden Bank Room

Abstract

Palliative care improves the quality of life for people who are seriously ill, and the primary mechanism of action is communication through conversation. Little is understood about the factors that influence the process of such conversations. The immediate physical environment can affect how people interact with one another in conversation. Understanding the environmental factors that can influence the process of these conversations is necessary for encouraging effective communication in this field. We analyzed the audio data from a cross sectional study of 361 conversations between hospitalized seriously ill patients and their clinicians. We documented temperature, noise level, smell, foot traffic, room type, and lighting at the time of the conversation. All audio recordings were transcribed in a standard format, and natural language processing analysis was conducted to extract variables such as word volume, turns, and duration. We observed a dose dependent association between decreasing temperature and frequency of speaker turns. Noise was inversely related to the turns per minute and clinicians used fewer words in rooms with unpleasant smells. Immediate environmental factors are associated with how people engage with one another in palliative care conversations.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Effect of the Physical Environment on Palliative Care Conversations

Palliative care improves the quality of life for people who are seriously ill, and the primary mechanism of action is communication through conversation. Little is understood about the factors that influence the process of such conversations. The immediate physical environment can affect how people interact with one another in conversation. Understanding the environmental factors that can influence the process of these conversations is necessary for encouraging effective communication in this field. We analyzed the audio data from a cross sectional study of 361 conversations between hospitalized seriously ill patients and their clinicians. We documented temperature, noise level, smell, foot traffic, room type, and lighting at the time of the conversation. All audio recordings were transcribed in a standard format, and natural language processing analysis was conducted to extract variables such as word volume, turns, and duration. We observed a dose dependent association between decreasing temperature and frequency of speaker turns. Noise was inversely related to the turns per minute and clinicians used fewer words in rooms with unpleasant smells. Immediate environmental factors are associated with how people engage with one another in palliative care conversations.