Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Jean Harvey

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Dietetics, Nutrition and Food Sciences

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Presentation Title

Trends in Diet and Chronobiology in College Students

Time

9:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Health Sciences

Abstract

Objective

Research suggests that chronobiology may be related to dietary intake with “evening type” patterns associated with higher caloric intake. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between chronobiology and dietary intake in a sample of college students.

Methods

Participants were recruited from the Fundamentals of Nutrition (NFS 043) course. They completed a 22- Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). The MEQ classified participants into morning types, evening types or indeterminate based on established cut points. Participants also submitted a three-day dietary recall which was analyzed for calorie and macronutrient intakes. Participants also reported on the frequency of dining options utilization.

Results

The MEQ classified participants (n=79; 16.8% male; 54% first year, 31% sophomore; 15% junior, senior or CDE) as 28% morning, 62% intermediate, and 10% evening. Calorie and macronutrient consumption was representative of the average American diet, with total average calorie intake at 1783/day across all groups. There were no significant differences in calorie intake or macronutrient consumption based on morning/evening profile except for protein. Protein consumption was significantly higher in the morning classification only when compared to the intermediate (18% vs. 14% of total calories, p

Conclusion

This is the first study to evaluate chronobiology and dietary intake in college students. Further research is needed to understand the role of circadian rhythm and health behaviors in this population group.

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Trends in Diet and Chronobiology in College Students

Objective

Research suggests that chronobiology may be related to dietary intake with “evening type” patterns associated with higher caloric intake. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between chronobiology and dietary intake in a sample of college students.

Methods

Participants were recruited from the Fundamentals of Nutrition (NFS 043) course. They completed a 22- Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). The MEQ classified participants into morning types, evening types or indeterminate based on established cut points. Participants also submitted a three-day dietary recall which was analyzed for calorie and macronutrient intakes. Participants also reported on the frequency of dining options utilization.

Results

The MEQ classified participants (n=79; 16.8% male; 54% first year, 31% sophomore; 15% junior, senior or CDE) as 28% morning, 62% intermediate, and 10% evening. Calorie and macronutrient consumption was representative of the average American diet, with total average calorie intake at 1783/day across all groups. There were no significant differences in calorie intake or macronutrient consumption based on morning/evening profile except for protein. Protein consumption was significantly higher in the morning classification only when compared to the intermediate (18% vs. 14% of total calories, p

Conclusion

This is the first study to evaluate chronobiology and dietary intake in college students. Further research is needed to understand the role of circadian rhythm and health behaviors in this population group.