Presentation Title

Lung epithelial PDIA3 plays a critical role in influenza infection

Presenter's Name(s)

Nicolas Chamberlain, UVMFollow

Time

1:10 PM

Location

Jost Foundation Room

Abstract

Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) are a family of redox chaperones that catalyze formation or isomerization of disulfide bonds in proteins. Previous studies have shown that one member, PDIA3, interacts with influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA), and that this interaction is required for efficient oxidative folding of HA in vitro. However it is unknown whether these host-viral protein interactions occur during active infection and whether this interaction represent a putative target for the treatment of influenza infection. Current therapies targeting viral proteins are often limited in their effectiveness due to rapid development of viral resistance;targeting host proteins may avoid these limitations. Here we show that PDIA3 is specifically upregulated in IAV infected mouse or human lung epithelial cells and PDIA3 directly interacts with IAV-HA. Among PDI inhibitors tested, we found LOC14 inhibits PDIA3 at an IC50 of 5μM. Treatment with LOC14 inhibits PDIA3 activity in lung epithelial cells and subsequently decreases disulfide bonds, and oligomerization (maturation) of HA in both pandemic H1N1 and seasonal H3N2 infected lung epithelial cells. Disulfide labeling analysis indicated that inhibition of PDIA3 activity also decreased disulfide bonds in IAV-neuraminidase (NA) and these differences in oxidative folding correspond to a subsequent decrease in NA activity. Furthermore, these decreases in disulfide bonds significantly decrease viral load, and pro-inflammatory response from primary lung epithelial cells. Lung epithelial specific deletion of PDIA3 in mice results in a significant decreases in viral burden and levels of inflammatory-immune markers in mouse lung, as well as significantly improved airway mechanics (function). Taken together, these results suggest PDIA3 is required for effective influenza pathogenesis in vivo, and inhibition of PDIA3 may aid future development anti-influenza therapies based on inhibition of host PDIs to circumvent antigenic drifts and shifts of influenza and may lend critically needed help during pandemic and severe influenza seasons.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Vikas Anathy

Status

Graduate

Student College

Graduate College

Program/Major

Cellular, Molecular and Biomedical Sciences

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Lung epithelial PDIA3 plays a critical role in influenza infection

Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) are a family of redox chaperones that catalyze formation or isomerization of disulfide bonds in proteins. Previous studies have shown that one member, PDIA3, interacts with influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA), and that this interaction is required for efficient oxidative folding of HA in vitro. However it is unknown whether these host-viral protein interactions occur during active infection and whether this interaction represent a putative target for the treatment of influenza infection. Current therapies targeting viral proteins are often limited in their effectiveness due to rapid development of viral resistance;targeting host proteins may avoid these limitations. Here we show that PDIA3 is specifically upregulated in IAV infected mouse or human lung epithelial cells and PDIA3 directly interacts with IAV-HA. Among PDI inhibitors tested, we found LOC14 inhibits PDIA3 at an IC50 of 5μM. Treatment with LOC14 inhibits PDIA3 activity in lung epithelial cells and subsequently decreases disulfide bonds, and oligomerization (maturation) of HA in both pandemic H1N1 and seasonal H3N2 infected lung epithelial cells. Disulfide labeling analysis indicated that inhibition of PDIA3 activity also decreased disulfide bonds in IAV-neuraminidase (NA) and these differences in oxidative folding correspond to a subsequent decrease in NA activity. Furthermore, these decreases in disulfide bonds significantly decrease viral load, and pro-inflammatory response from primary lung epithelial cells. Lung epithelial specific deletion of PDIA3 in mice results in a significant decreases in viral burden and levels of inflammatory-immune markers in mouse lung, as well as significantly improved airway mechanics (function). Taken together, these results suggest PDIA3 is required for effective influenza pathogenesis in vivo, and inhibition of PDIA3 may aid future development anti-influenza therapies based on inhibition of host PDIs to circumvent antigenic drifts and shifts of influenza and may lend critically needed help during pandemic and severe influenza seasons.