Presentation Title

FORMAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS WITH DISABILITIES IN GHANA: A POWERFUL WEAPON TO CHANGE THE WORLD

Project Collaborators

I would like to acknowledge my dissertation team: Katharine Shepherd, Ed.D., Maureen Neumann, Ph.D. and Colby Kervick, Ed.D

Time

All Day

Location

Humanities Center Creative Lounge

Abstract

Abstract

Women with disabilities (WWD) from countries around the world, including Ghana, deserve the right to a public education, but are often deprived of it. The World Report on Disability estimates that literacy rates for WWD may be as low as 1%. The World Bank Report also reports that more than one billion people may experience some form of disability, with as many as one in five experiencing significant disabilities. In developing countries, the prevalence of disability and its impacts on a wide range of developmental outcomes are usually more significant than they are in countries with well-established educational and social systems. Children and women with disabilities are especially disadvantaged with respect to school enrollment, educational attainment, and learning. The current study used a critical, feminist phenomenological lens (Alcoff, 2000 p.39) to explore the access and experiences with education for ten Ghanaian women with disabilities. Using methods associated with narrative inquiry, this paper reports findings related to the women’s positive and negative experiences, as well as recommendations for improvements to practice and policy to help remove barriers to access to education.

Keywords: disability, women, education, cultural barriers, attitudinal change

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Katherine Shepherd

Secondary Mentor NetID

Deborah Lisi-Baker

Secondary Mentor Name

Winnie Looby

Graduate Student Mentors

Faith Yakubian, Rebecca Haslam and Mika Moore

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Education and Social Services

Program/Major

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

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FORMAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS WITH DISABILITIES IN GHANA: A POWERFUL WEAPON TO CHANGE THE WORLD

Abstract

Women with disabilities (WWD) from countries around the world, including Ghana, deserve the right to a public education, but are often deprived of it. The World Report on Disability estimates that literacy rates for WWD may be as low as 1%. The World Bank Report also reports that more than one billion people may experience some form of disability, with as many as one in five experiencing significant disabilities. In developing countries, the prevalence of disability and its impacts on a wide range of developmental outcomes are usually more significant than they are in countries with well-established educational and social systems. Children and women with disabilities are especially disadvantaged with respect to school enrollment, educational attainment, and learning. The current study used a critical, feminist phenomenological lens (Alcoff, 2000 p.39) to explore the access and experiences with education for ten Ghanaian women with disabilities. Using methods associated with narrative inquiry, this paper reports findings related to the women’s positive and negative experiences, as well as recommendations for improvements to practice and policy to help remove barriers to access to education.

Keywords: disability, women, education, cultural barriers, attitudinal change