Presenter's Name(s)

Claire G. CrowleyFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Nicole Conroy

Project Collaborators

UVM Women's Center

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Education and Social Services

Program/Major

Human Development and Family Studies

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Title

Exploring the Emerging Trend of Gender Inclusivity in Women's Centers: A Community Based Research Project and Evaluation of UVM's Women's Center

Time

3:00 PM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Social Sciences

Abstract

Currently, an emerging trend exists in university women’s centers to reconsider their missions and move toward greater gender inclusivity. The University of Vermont (UVM) Women’s Center identified the need to have a third party assist in evaluating their services and programming as they consider refining their identity, mission, and vision, which serves as the rationale for this project. The aim of this project is to gather data on public knowledge, perceived accessibility, and effectiveness of (a) the Women’s Center, in general, and (b) victim advocacy, in particular. This study was conducted with 164 participants affiliated with the University of Vermont (i.e., students, faculty, staff, and recent alumni). Both strengths and areas of improvement were identified in several areas, including general knowledge and perceptions, location and physical space, programming and resources, barriers to utilizing, perceived accessibility and inclusivity, gender equity on campus, and the name of the Women’s Center. Research and practice implications are provided as a result from this study.

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Exploring the Emerging Trend of Gender Inclusivity in Women's Centers: A Community Based Research Project and Evaluation of UVM's Women's Center

Currently, an emerging trend exists in university women’s centers to reconsider their missions and move toward greater gender inclusivity. The University of Vermont (UVM) Women’s Center identified the need to have a third party assist in evaluating their services and programming as they consider refining their identity, mission, and vision, which serves as the rationale for this project. The aim of this project is to gather data on public knowledge, perceived accessibility, and effectiveness of (a) the Women’s Center, in general, and (b) victim advocacy, in particular. This study was conducted with 164 participants affiliated with the University of Vermont (i.e., students, faculty, staff, and recent alumni). Both strengths and areas of improvement were identified in several areas, including general knowledge and perceptions, location and physical space, programming and resources, barriers to utilizing, perceived accessibility and inclusivity, gender equity on campus, and the name of the Women’s Center. Research and practice implications are provided as a result from this study.