Presentation Title

The importance of winter foraging by thermally-dissimilar fish species

Project Collaborators

Dr. Jason Stockwell (Co- Advisor); Dr. Ellen Marsden (Co-Advisor)

Time

1:10 PM

Location

Frank Livak Ballroom

Abstract

How to manage energetic demands in the winter is a conundrum for temperate and high-latitude fishes, but each species may respond differently to such demands. Our research will test if cool- and warm-water fish species differ in winter foraging strategies and the degree to which winter foraging influences their growth and survival. Diets of yellow perch (cool-water species), pumpkinseed (warm-water), and bluegill (warm-water) will be compared within winters and among seasons. The importance of winter foraging for the annual energy budget of fishes will be evaluated by measuring seasonal changes in total lipid content. Individual growth rates will be estimated using bioenergetics models to determine if winter diets contribute significantly to annual growth. Models will also provide an opportunity to test how individual growth across thermally-dissimilar fish species may respond to predicted climate changes, such as increases in mean water temperature. Results may be particularly relevant to fish communities in mid-latitude lakes that exhibit annual variations in ice cover and winter conditions and thus could provide novel insights into the relative importance of winter foraging to fish population dynamics.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jason Stockwell

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biology

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The importance of winter foraging by thermally-dissimilar fish species

How to manage energetic demands in the winter is a conundrum for temperate and high-latitude fishes, but each species may respond differently to such demands. Our research will test if cool- and warm-water fish species differ in winter foraging strategies and the degree to which winter foraging influences their growth and survival. Diets of yellow perch (cool-water species), pumpkinseed (warm-water), and bluegill (warm-water) will be compared within winters and among seasons. The importance of winter foraging for the annual energy budget of fishes will be evaluated by measuring seasonal changes in total lipid content. Individual growth rates will be estimated using bioenergetics models to determine if winter diets contribute significantly to annual growth. Models will also provide an opportunity to test how individual growth across thermally-dissimilar fish species may respond to predicted climate changes, such as increases in mean water temperature. Results may be particularly relevant to fish communities in mid-latitude lakes that exhibit annual variations in ice cover and winter conditions and thus could provide novel insights into the relative importance of winter foraging to fish population dynamics.