Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Pablo Bose

Secondary Mentor NetID

emmiller, meberhar

Secondary Mentor Name

Eleanor Miller, Maeve Eberhardt

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Global Studies

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Title

Understanding Public Perceptions of Immigrant Criminality

Time

3:00 PM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Social Sciences

Abstract

The rhetoric surrounding immigration in the United States has grown

increasingly divided in recent years. One anti-immigration argument that seems to

arise a great deal is that immigrants are criminals and bring higher rates of crime to

the communities they reside in. However, existing data and literature on this subject

consistently shows that a higher population of foreign-born individuals does not

increase crime rates of communities into which they settle; in some cases, these

locations may have even lower crime rates after the arrival of newcomers. Despite

these realities on the ground, the discussion within popular culture and media

remains focused on illegality and criminality and has far-reaching consequences,

affecting national policy decisions and influencing the ways in which much of the

American population views immigration. Although immigrants and refugees from

many different origins are often portrayed as criminals, this project will focus on

Latinx immigrants and the “Latino Threat” narrative specifically.

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Understanding Public Perceptions of Immigrant Criminality

The rhetoric surrounding immigration in the United States has grown

increasingly divided in recent years. One anti-immigration argument that seems to

arise a great deal is that immigrants are criminals and bring higher rates of crime to

the communities they reside in. However, existing data and literature on this subject

consistently shows that a higher population of foreign-born individuals does not

increase crime rates of communities into which they settle; in some cases, these

locations may have even lower crime rates after the arrival of newcomers. Despite

these realities on the ground, the discussion within popular culture and media

remains focused on illegality and criminality and has far-reaching consequences,

affecting national policy decisions and influencing the ways in which much of the

American population views immigration. Although immigrants and refugees from

many different origins are often portrayed as criminals, this project will focus on

Latinx immigrants and the “Latino Threat” narrative specifically.