Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Giuseppe Petrucci

Project Collaborators

Christopher Snyder

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Chemistry

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

Presentation Title

Secondary Organic Aerosol Production via Ozonolysis of Green Leaf Volatiles

Time

1:30 PM

Location

Chittenden Bank Room

Abstract

Aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play important roles in environmental processes. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in particular are produced via gas phase oxidation reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Recently, focus has shifted to green leaf volatiles (GLVs; a subset of VOCs), which have the potential to contribute significantly to the overall SOA budget. Here, investigations of the ozonolysis of relevant GLV SOA precursors cis-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA) and cis-3-hexenol (HXL) are presented. Specifically, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), and Near-Infrared Laser Desorption-Ionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (NIR-LDI-AMS) were utilized to probe both physical and chemical properties of SOA formed in the University of Vermont Environmental Chamber (UVMEC) under dry (relative humidity, RH

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Secondary Organic Aerosol Production via Ozonolysis of Green Leaf Volatiles

Aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play important roles in environmental processes. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in particular are produced via gas phase oxidation reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Recently, focus has shifted to green leaf volatiles (GLVs; a subset of VOCs), which have the potential to contribute significantly to the overall SOA budget. Here, investigations of the ozonolysis of relevant GLV SOA precursors cis-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA) and cis-3-hexenol (HXL) are presented. Specifically, a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), and Near-Infrared Laser Desorption-Ionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (NIR-LDI-AMS) were utilized to probe both physical and chemical properties of SOA formed in the University of Vermont Environmental Chamber (UVMEC) under dry (relative humidity, RH