Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Meredith Niles

Project Collaborators

Amy Nickerson (Advisor), Diane Imrie (Advisor)

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Dietetics, Nutrition and Food Sciences

Primary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

Presentation Title

Farmer’s Attitudes & Beliefs of Climate Change Over Time

Time

11:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Food & Environmental Sciences

Abstract

Background

Numerous studies have explored factors influencing farmer’s attitudes and beliefs about climate change, but few if any have examined these perceptions over time. This study assessed shifts in farmer’s perceptions of climate change over six years following a five-year drought in California.

Methods

Data were collected through mail surveys from farmers in Yolo County, California in 2011 and 2017 using publically available pesticide use reports and organic registrations. Descriptive statistics were calculated using Stata software and statistical comparisons were conducted using Kruskal Wallis tests (non-parametric ANOVA).

Results

Mean farmer age, full-time farmer status, and mean farm sizes were not statistically different indicating a demographically similar population. Farmers in 2011 were much more likely to pump more groundwater in the future (70% likely or very likely, p

Conclusion

These results suggest that significant shifts in climate perceptions and behaviors have occurred in this farming population following five years of drought. Since climate perceptions have been linked to mitigation and adaptation behaviors among farmers, these results could further influence future agricultural changes.

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Farmer’s Attitudes & Beliefs of Climate Change Over Time

Background

Numerous studies have explored factors influencing farmer’s attitudes and beliefs about climate change, but few if any have examined these perceptions over time. This study assessed shifts in farmer’s perceptions of climate change over six years following a five-year drought in California.

Methods

Data were collected through mail surveys from farmers in Yolo County, California in 2011 and 2017 using publically available pesticide use reports and organic registrations. Descriptive statistics were calculated using Stata software and statistical comparisons were conducted using Kruskal Wallis tests (non-parametric ANOVA).

Results

Mean farmer age, full-time farmer status, and mean farm sizes were not statistically different indicating a demographically similar population. Farmers in 2011 were much more likely to pump more groundwater in the future (70% likely or very likely, p

Conclusion

These results suggest that significant shifts in climate perceptions and behaviors have occurred in this farming population following five years of drought. Since climate perceptions have been linked to mitigation and adaptation behaviors among farmers, these results could further influence future agricultural changes.