Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Jana Kraft

Project Collaborators

Korin Eckstrom, Thomas L. Jetton, Jana Kraft

Secondary Mentor NetID

tjetton

Secondary Mentor Name

Thomas L. Jetton

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Animal, Nutrition and Food Sciences

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Secondary Research Category

Health Sciences

Presentation Title

Colonic Bacterial Composition in Aged CD-1 Mice Fed Diets Varying in Fat Quality is Sex-dependent

Time

10:50 AM

Location

Jost Foundation Room

Abstract

Evidence suggests that sex influences the effect of diet on the gut bacterial composition, yet, no studies have been performed assessing dietary fat quality (i.e., fatty acid composition) in this context. This study examined the effect of dietary fat quality on colonic bacterial composition in an aged, genetically-diverse mouse population. CD-1 mice were fed isoenergetic diets consisting of (1) control fat (CO; “Western-style” fat blend), (2) CO supplemented with 30% fish oil, (3) CO supplemented with 30% dairy fat, or (4) CO supplemented with 30% echium oil. Fecal samples were collected at mid-life and aged (reproductively senescent) time points. In aged males fed dairy fat, the relative abundance of Firmicutes was lower while the relative abundance of Bacteriodetes was greater compared to mid-life. The number of observed genera was greater in aged females fed echium oil but lower in aged males fed control fat compared to mid-life. In aged mice fed fish oil, alpha diversity was greater in females, but lower in males. At the OTU level, 73 bacterial taxa were differentially expressed in both males and females. In conclusion, sex is a critical factor in colonic bacterial composition of an aged, genetically-heterogenous population consuming diets varying in fat quality.

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Colonic Bacterial Composition in Aged CD-1 Mice Fed Diets Varying in Fat Quality is Sex-dependent

Evidence suggests that sex influences the effect of diet on the gut bacterial composition, yet, no studies have been performed assessing dietary fat quality (i.e., fatty acid composition) in this context. This study examined the effect of dietary fat quality on colonic bacterial composition in an aged, genetically-diverse mouse population. CD-1 mice were fed isoenergetic diets consisting of (1) control fat (CO; “Western-style” fat blend), (2) CO supplemented with 30% fish oil, (3) CO supplemented with 30% dairy fat, or (4) CO supplemented with 30% echium oil. Fecal samples were collected at mid-life and aged (reproductively senescent) time points. In aged males fed dairy fat, the relative abundance of Firmicutes was lower while the relative abundance of Bacteriodetes was greater compared to mid-life. The number of observed genera was greater in aged females fed echium oil but lower in aged males fed control fat compared to mid-life. In aged mice fed fish oil, alpha diversity was greater in females, but lower in males. At the OTU level, 73 bacterial taxa were differentially expressed in both males and females. In conclusion, sex is a critical factor in colonic bacterial composition of an aged, genetically-heterogenous population consuming diets varying in fat quality.