Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Karen Fondacaro

Project Collaborators

Holly Weldon, Jordan Weith, Dan Raut, Karen Fondacaro

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Psychological Science

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Title

The Role of Daily Stress in the Psychosocial Well-Being Refugees and Torture Survivors

Time

2:30 PM

Location

Frank Livak Ballroom

Abstract

Background and Purpose/Objectives: Trauma-focused models often attribute refugee mental health problems to mass conflict or political violence experiences (van Ommeren, Saxena, & Saraceno, 2005). However, research indicates that daily stressors may have an impact on mental health beyond experiences of violence (Miller & Rassmussen, 2010). Additionally, researchers and clinicians tend to focus on symptoms rather than factors that contribute to psychological well-being. The Chronic Traumatic Stress model (CTS; Fondacaro & Mazzula, 2018) views both symptom reduction and psychological well-being as important outcomes for clinical and empirical consideration. Moreover, the CTS framework proposes an ecological understanding of the contextual factors that influence these outcomes. The current study intends to build on this framework by examining the unique influences of post-migration issues and daily stressors, trauma-exposure, and psychological symptoms on the psychological well-being of treatment-seeking refugees. Methodology: Data collection is currently underway. Participants will complete measures by engaging in standard intake procedures at an outpatient clinic in the United States’ Northeast. Procedures and research directions were determined following a community-based participatory framework (Minkler & Wallerstein, 2011). It is expected that approximately 50 intakes will have been completed by the time of presentation. Results: It is hypothesized that daily stressors will demonstrate a significant negative relationship with psychological well-being beyond the influence of PTSD symptoms, depression, and trauma-exposure. This hypothesis will be examined using hierarchical regression. Conclusions and Discussion: Results will be discussed in terms of implications for treatment and assessment of adult refugees seeking treatment in outpatient settings following re-settlement.

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The Role of Daily Stress in the Psychosocial Well-Being Refugees and Torture Survivors

Background and Purpose/Objectives: Trauma-focused models often attribute refugee mental health problems to mass conflict or political violence experiences (van Ommeren, Saxena, & Saraceno, 2005). However, research indicates that daily stressors may have an impact on mental health beyond experiences of violence (Miller & Rassmussen, 2010). Additionally, researchers and clinicians tend to focus on symptoms rather than factors that contribute to psychological well-being. The Chronic Traumatic Stress model (CTS; Fondacaro & Mazzula, 2018) views both symptom reduction and psychological well-being as important outcomes for clinical and empirical consideration. Moreover, the CTS framework proposes an ecological understanding of the contextual factors that influence these outcomes. The current study intends to build on this framework by examining the unique influences of post-migration issues and daily stressors, trauma-exposure, and psychological symptoms on the psychological well-being of treatment-seeking refugees. Methodology: Data collection is currently underway. Participants will complete measures by engaging in standard intake procedures at an outpatient clinic in the United States’ Northeast. Procedures and research directions were determined following a community-based participatory framework (Minkler & Wallerstein, 2011). It is expected that approximately 50 intakes will have been completed by the time of presentation. Results: It is hypothesized that daily stressors will demonstrate a significant negative relationship with psychological well-being beyond the influence of PTSD symptoms, depression, and trauma-exposure. This hypothesis will be examined using hierarchical regression. Conclusions and Discussion: Results will be discussed in terms of implications for treatment and assessment of adult refugees seeking treatment in outpatient settings following re-settlement.