Presenter's Name(s)

Katherine Elizabeth BrennanFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Thomas Borchert

Secondary Mentor NetID

imorgens

Secondary Mentor Name

Ilyse Morgenstein Fuerst

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Religion

Second Program (optional)

French

Primary Research Category

Arts & Humanities

Secondary Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Title

Tout a Changé! The Spectre of Islam in a (Secular) Catholic France

Time

2:10 PM

Location

Jost Foundation Room

Abstract

Beyond simply a category of explanation, religion is a category of contestation. Despite the instability of the category of religion, governments worldwide participate in signifying what does and does not count in their laws and legal systems. The systems of law in France provide no exception. French laws reflect a desire to differentiate church and state, or laïcité. However, beneath the surface, particular institutions remain privileged. France is a country that claims secularity, yet within that secularity lies an institutional understanding of what religions are and what that means for the law. Legal systems in France are saturated with Catholic undertones, and laws regarding religion disproportionately affect minority religious communities under the masquerade of neutrality. Thus reflecting anxieties emerging from the encroaching “other” which are obscured by labels such as ‘Islamophobia.’ In this project, I examine legal efforts to differentiate religion and non-religion with a focus on recent court cases around school lunches and the rights of religious minorities.

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Tout a Changé! The Spectre of Islam in a (Secular) Catholic France

Beyond simply a category of explanation, religion is a category of contestation. Despite the instability of the category of religion, governments worldwide participate in signifying what does and does not count in their laws and legal systems. The systems of law in France provide no exception. French laws reflect a desire to differentiate church and state, or laïcité. However, beneath the surface, particular institutions remain privileged. France is a country that claims secularity, yet within that secularity lies an institutional understanding of what religions are and what that means for the law. Legal systems in France are saturated with Catholic undertones, and laws regarding religion disproportionately affect minority religious communities under the masquerade of neutrality. Thus reflecting anxieties emerging from the encroaching “other” which are obscured by labels such as ‘Islamophobia.’ In this project, I examine legal efforts to differentiate religion and non-religion with a focus on recent court cases around school lunches and the rights of religious minorities.