Presenter's Name(s)

Colin MurphyFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Jennifer Laurent

Secondary Mentor NetID

lclewis

Secondary Mentor Name

Laura Lewis

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Nursing

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Presentation Title

The association between food addiction and substance use in university students

Time

9:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Health Sciences

Abstract

Background: Approximately 1/3 of university students are classified as overweight or obese. Most people begin use or regular use of alcohol and drugs during university years. Recent research has demonstrated that food acts similarly as alcohol and drugs on the mesolimbic pathway of the brain, which is associated with pleasure and reward. This new disorder, known as food addiction, has similar characteristics to that of substance use disorder.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there was an association between food addiction and alcohol and drug usage among university students.

Theoretical Framework: The theoretical framework referenced in regard to this research was the incentive sensitization theory of addiction. This theory posits that certain individuals are hypersensitive to the incentive effects of habit- forming drugs and/or behaviors, such as food.

Methods: Cross-sectional, on- line survey of 27 questions selected from the modified Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0 (mYFAS 2.0) and the European School Survey Project on Alcohol. Descriptive statistics and Chi- square were computed.

Results: The survey had 96 respondents, of which 75 were useable. Of the 75 respondents, 29.7% were obese or overweight and 22.7% met the threshold for food addiction (FA). Respondents with food addicted had a higher BMI than non- FA respondents (BMI of 28.7 vs BMI of 23.7; p= 0.003). Respondents with FA were more likely to use opioids (p= 0.033) and amphetamines (p= 0.03).

Conclusions & Implications: Participants with FA were more likely to be overweight or obese. There appears to be an association between FA and co-occurring use of other habit- forming substances that may place individuals with FA at risk for two major health conditions, obesity and substance use disorder (SUDs). Future studies are needed with a larger sample size to better determine if food addiction and co- morbid substance use leads to future substance use disorders in the university population.

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The association between food addiction and substance use in university students

Background: Approximately 1/3 of university students are classified as overweight or obese. Most people begin use or regular use of alcohol and drugs during university years. Recent research has demonstrated that food acts similarly as alcohol and drugs on the mesolimbic pathway of the brain, which is associated with pleasure and reward. This new disorder, known as food addiction, has similar characteristics to that of substance use disorder.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if there was an association between food addiction and alcohol and drug usage among university students.

Theoretical Framework: The theoretical framework referenced in regard to this research was the incentive sensitization theory of addiction. This theory posits that certain individuals are hypersensitive to the incentive effects of habit- forming drugs and/or behaviors, such as food.

Methods: Cross-sectional, on- line survey of 27 questions selected from the modified Yale Food Addiction Scale 2.0 (mYFAS 2.0) and the European School Survey Project on Alcohol. Descriptive statistics and Chi- square were computed.

Results: The survey had 96 respondents, of which 75 were useable. Of the 75 respondents, 29.7% were obese or overweight and 22.7% met the threshold for food addiction (FA). Respondents with food addicted had a higher BMI than non- FA respondents (BMI of 28.7 vs BMI of 23.7; p= 0.003). Respondents with FA were more likely to use opioids (p= 0.033) and amphetamines (p= 0.03).

Conclusions & Implications: Participants with FA were more likely to be overweight or obese. There appears to be an association between FA and co-occurring use of other habit- forming substances that may place individuals with FA at risk for two major health conditions, obesity and substance use disorder (SUDs). Future studies are needed with a larger sample size to better determine if food addiction and co- morbid substance use leads to future substance use disorders in the university population.