Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Tammy Kolbe

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Education and Social Services

Program/Major

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

Secondary Research Category

Professional Studies

Presentation Title

Factors Influencing the Identification and Classification of Lower Elementary Students with Emotional Disturbance: Implications for Schools

Time

11:40 AM

Location

Chittenden Bank Room

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors that account for the significant variation in rates of emotional disturbance among Vermont school districts. In Vermont, the statewide percentage of special education students identified as emotionally disturbed is 18%, the highest in the nation and almost three times greater than the national average. Among districts, the percentage ranges from a low of 4.6% to a high of 34% (Kolbe & Killeen, 2017). Differences in identification rates between school districts might reflect differences in the actual incidence in the community, outside of districts’ control. It also may be the case that differences exist due to state and local policies, practices and resources. A key goal for this study will be to understand whether and to what extent inter-district variability is due to population-based factors, largely outside educators’ control, or other factors that might be influenced by policy. Specifically, the study will be guided by the following questions: 1. What is the extent of variability in prevalence in children identified with emotional disturbance across Vermont school districts? 2. Are there differences in demographic and community characteristics between districts with comparatively high and low percentages of students identified with emotional disturbance? 3. To what extent do policy malleable factors (e.g., policies, practices, and resources) differentiate high and low prevalence districts?

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Factors Influencing the Identification and Classification of Lower Elementary Students with Emotional Disturbance: Implications for Schools

The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors that account for the significant variation in rates of emotional disturbance among Vermont school districts. In Vermont, the statewide percentage of special education students identified as emotionally disturbed is 18%, the highest in the nation and almost three times greater than the national average. Among districts, the percentage ranges from a low of 4.6% to a high of 34% (Kolbe & Killeen, 2017). Differences in identification rates between school districts might reflect differences in the actual incidence in the community, outside of districts’ control. It also may be the case that differences exist due to state and local policies, practices and resources. A key goal for this study will be to understand whether and to what extent inter-district variability is due to population-based factors, largely outside educators’ control, or other factors that might be influenced by policy. Specifically, the study will be guided by the following questions: 1. What is the extent of variability in prevalence in children identified with emotional disturbance across Vermont school districts? 2. Are there differences in demographic and community characteristics between districts with comparatively high and low percentages of students identified with emotional disturbance? 3. To what extent do policy malleable factors (e.g., policies, practices, and resources) differentiate high and low prevalence districts?