Presenter's Name(s)

Steven HamiltonFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Nicole Phelps

Project Collaborators

Courtney Smith, Kiara Day, Megan Gamiz, Madeline Hunter (HST 296 World’s Fair group Members)

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

History

Primary Research Category

Arts & Humanities

Presentation Title

The Empire In Chicago: Ottoman Exhibits at the World's Columbian Exhibition (Attached to the HST 296 World’s Fair group)

Time

11:20 am

Location

Mildred Livak Ballroom

Abstract

Steven Hamilton. The Empire In Chicago: Ottoman Exhibits at the World's Columbian Exhibition. M.A. University of Vermont April 2019.

In conjunction with the rest of the HST 296 World's Fair group, this paper attempts to examine the presence of the Ottoman Empire (designated "Turkey" in some primary materials) at the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893 in Chicago. The primary lens will be Ottoman efforts to reinforce economic-military ties with their contemporaries in Western Europe and the Americas, in the wake of internal stability and threats along the Russian frontier.

The presence of the Ottoman Empire at the World's Columbian Exposition is worth pursuing, because the admission of the Empire into "the White City" to present herself (as opposed to being presented) to the world raises issues about how far the European state system had spread by the late 19th century, and how non-Western powers bought into (or did not buy into) the overarching narrative of progress.

Problem Statement: This paper examines the use of World's Fairs as state "marketing," in order to secure closer ties with potential partners as well as to establish legitimacy in the European state system.

Methods: This paper will comprise an assessment of whatever secondary material has already been published on similar or related subjects, as well as archival documents acquired via UVM's libraries and databases.

Results:

TBD

Conclusion: While first decade of the 20th century was marked by a significant decline in Ottoman internal stability and international prestige, the Empire was still able to actively compete at events such as the Chicago World's Fair, and used these events in order to reinforce its position diplomatically.

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The Empire In Chicago: Ottoman Exhibits at the World's Columbian Exhibition (Attached to the HST 296 World’s Fair group)

Steven Hamilton. The Empire In Chicago: Ottoman Exhibits at the World's Columbian Exhibition. M.A. University of Vermont April 2019.

In conjunction with the rest of the HST 296 World's Fair group, this paper attempts to examine the presence of the Ottoman Empire (designated "Turkey" in some primary materials) at the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893 in Chicago. The primary lens will be Ottoman efforts to reinforce economic-military ties with their contemporaries in Western Europe and the Americas, in the wake of internal stability and threats along the Russian frontier.

The presence of the Ottoman Empire at the World's Columbian Exposition is worth pursuing, because the admission of the Empire into "the White City" to present herself (as opposed to being presented) to the world raises issues about how far the European state system had spread by the late 19th century, and how non-Western powers bought into (or did not buy into) the overarching narrative of progress.

Problem Statement: This paper examines the use of World's Fairs as state "marketing," in order to secure closer ties with potential partners as well as to establish legitimacy in the European state system.

Methods: This paper will comprise an assessment of whatever secondary material has already been published on similar or related subjects, as well as archival documents acquired via UVM's libraries and databases.

Results:

TBD

Conclusion: While first decade of the 20th century was marked by a significant decline in Ottoman internal stability and international prestige, the Empire was still able to actively compete at events such as the Chicago World's Fair, and used these events in order to reinforce its position diplomatically.