Presenter's Name(s)

Timothy F. LaracyFollow

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Jeff Frolik

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Program/Major

Electrical Engineering

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

Presentation Title

Using Software Defined Radio to Interrogate a Passive Frequency Doubling Chip

Time

3:00 PM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Engineering & Physical Sciences

Abstract

The use of embedded sensing has increased significantly in recent years with the growth of the Internet of Things and the desire for flexible, robust sensing systems. Often times the sensing device (or node) will operate at very low power, allowing it to stay where it was deployed for long periods of time without maintenance. For some harsher applications, having a battery in your sensor node is not ideal since batteries cannot perform in extreme temperatures or pressures. Passive wireless sensing technologies, such as micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), surface acoustic wave (SAW), and radio frequency identification (RFID) offer a distinct advantage over typical wireless sensors, as they do not need batteries, and can be interrogated remotely. In this work, an interrogator is designed to leverage a similar chip, known as a frequency doubling reflectenna (FDR). The FDR receives a signal at frequency f1, and transmits a signal at frequency 2*f1.

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Using Software Defined Radio to Interrogate a Passive Frequency Doubling Chip

The use of embedded sensing has increased significantly in recent years with the growth of the Internet of Things and the desire for flexible, robust sensing systems. Often times the sensing device (or node) will operate at very low power, allowing it to stay where it was deployed for long periods of time without maintenance. For some harsher applications, having a battery in your sensor node is not ideal since batteries cannot perform in extreme temperatures or pressures. Passive wireless sensing technologies, such as micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), surface acoustic wave (SAW), and radio frequency identification (RFID) offer a distinct advantage over typical wireless sensors, as they do not need batteries, and can be interrogated remotely. In this work, an interrogator is designed to leverage a similar chip, known as a frequency doubling reflectenna (FDR). The FDR receives a signal at frequency f1, and transmits a signal at frequency 2*f1.