Primary Faculty Mentor Name

John W. Barlow

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Animal, Nutrition and Food Sciences

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Presentation Title

Comparison of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk and humans on dairy farms

Time

9:00 AM

Location

Silver Maple Ballroom - Biological Sciences

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and pathogen of several mammalian species, particularly humans and cattle. It is a common cause of food poisoning, community-acquired skin infections, and a major cause of hospital-acquired infections like bacteremia and pneumonia. S. aureus is also the most common etiological agent of contagious bovine mastitis, causing significant losses in the dairy industry. Although antimicrobial therapy is an important strategy for mastitis control as well as human infections, S. aureus exhibits resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobial agents narrowing the therapeutic options for clinicians and veterinarians. Additionally, the proximity of humans and animals in the dairy environment has caused transmission of such drug-resistant bacteria like Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) between animal and human hosts. So, it is necessary to monitor bacterial populations at the animal-human interface. Henceforth, we proposed a study to isolate S. aureus from cattle milk and humans to compare the genetic diversity of those isolates along with their antimicrobial resistance patterns. To this end, we have collected milk samples and human hand and nose swab samples from 16 farmstead cheese producers in Vermont. We, then, isolated presumptive S aureus using cultural and biochemical tests. Moving further, we will confirm presumptive S. aureus isolates by PCR amplification of the thermonuclease gene and strain-typing by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). After strain typing, we plan to perform antimicrobial sensitivity testing on all S. aureus strains by disc diffusion assay. PCR screening of those isolates will be done for antibiotic resistance determinants. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the presence of genetic similarities and antimicrobial resistant pattern of S. aureus strains among human and cattle hosts. This will be useful to determine the prevalence of human and livestock-associated MRSA strains of S. aureus in the farmstead cheese farms as well as their potential to colonize and infect both hosts.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Comparison of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk and humans on dairy farms

Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and pathogen of several mammalian species, particularly humans and cattle. It is a common cause of food poisoning, community-acquired skin infections, and a major cause of hospital-acquired infections like bacteremia and pneumonia. S. aureus is also the most common etiological agent of contagious bovine mastitis, causing significant losses in the dairy industry. Although antimicrobial therapy is an important strategy for mastitis control as well as human infections, S. aureus exhibits resistance to multiple classes of antimicrobial agents narrowing the therapeutic options for clinicians and veterinarians. Additionally, the proximity of humans and animals in the dairy environment has caused transmission of such drug-resistant bacteria like Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) between animal and human hosts. So, it is necessary to monitor bacterial populations at the animal-human interface. Henceforth, we proposed a study to isolate S. aureus from cattle milk and humans to compare the genetic diversity of those isolates along with their antimicrobial resistance patterns. To this end, we have collected milk samples and human hand and nose swab samples from 16 farmstead cheese producers in Vermont. We, then, isolated presumptive S aureus using cultural and biochemical tests. Moving further, we will confirm presumptive S. aureus isolates by PCR amplification of the thermonuclease gene and strain-typing by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). After strain typing, we plan to perform antimicrobial sensitivity testing on all S. aureus strains by disc diffusion assay. PCR screening of those isolates will be done for antibiotic resistance determinants. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the presence of genetic similarities and antimicrobial resistant pattern of S. aureus strains among human and cattle hosts. This will be useful to determine the prevalence of human and livestock-associated MRSA strains of S. aureus in the farmstead cheese farms as well as their potential to colonize and infect both hosts.