Presentation Title

Information for US-based professionals to support ethnically Nepali children with autism and their families in the US

Project Collaborators

Maria Mercedes Avila (Supervisor/Director, VT LEND) and Mary Alice Favro (Clinical Director, VT LEND)

Abstract

Prepared by Bidur Dahal, MS, MPH/UVM (cont.)

Title of Presentation:

Information for US-based professionals to support ethnically Nepali children with autism and families in the US.

Background:

This abstract is the result of the graduate assignment that I submitted to UVM VP Professor Patty Prelock for the partial fulfillment of the course “CSD299A Autism Spectrum Disorder” that I took last year in 2019. My presentation includes results of the literature review on autism in Nepal.

The information from the presentation can be utilized here in the UVM and/or US to develop ideas as to how providers can support the ethnically Nepali community living in Vermont and/or in the US by adopting culturally appropriate comprehensive services.

Abstract:

The history of autism, diagnostic practices and understanding about autism development are limited in Nepal. My presentation will focus on a brief history of autism diagnosis in Nepal, challenge areas such as lack of access and knowledge about autism, tools used for autism studies in Nepal and information for professionals to support this population. There are very few peer-reviewed research articles on autism in Nepal. Most of the available articles do not provide in-depth information on different aspects of autism assessment and intervention. However, some studies in Nepal showed more reliable and generalizable results with the help of adaptation and translation of screening tools, adapting the tools to be administered by low skill health screeners, providing trainings to the screeners, and making sure through pilot projects the adaption and acceptability of the screening tools among the local communities.

What I learned from the review is that health providers in Nepal are not well informed of ASD; so it is obvious that common people definitely are not well informed either. So, it is important to relate the lack of knowledge of ASD assessment and interventions with those people who are resettled here in the US from that country and advocate for the culturally responsive method to support people with a disability and their families. In addition, there are other language and cultural barriers they face here in the new country.

The take away will be that since we have quite a large population base from the ethic Nepali community group with a significant number of family members with disabilities in the US; it is vital to educate and inform our students, experts, professionals, policy makers and related entities to support this community at their best.

Reference:

Khatri, G. K., Onta, S. R., Tiwari, S., & Choulagai, B. P. (2011, August). Knowledge and Management Practices of Paediatricians about Autism Spectrum Disorder in Kathmandu, Nepal. Retrieved April 10, 2019, from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259568219_Knowledge_and_Management_Practices_of_Paediatricians_about_Autism_Spectrum_Disorder_in_Kathmandu_Nepal

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Patricia A Prelock

Secondary Mentor NetID

maria.avila@med.uvm.edu, maryalice.favro@med.uvm.edu

Secondary Mentor Name

Maria Mercedes Avila, Mary Alice Favro

Status

Graduate

Student College

Larner College of Medicine

Program/Major

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

Second College (optional)

Larner College of Medicine

Second Program/Major

Public Health

Secondary Research Category

Health Sciences

Tertiary Research Category

Professional Studies

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Information for US-based professionals to support ethnically Nepali children with autism and their families in the US

Prepared by Bidur Dahal, MS, MPH/UVM (cont.)

Title of Presentation:

Information for US-based professionals to support ethnically Nepali children with autism and families in the US.

Background:

This abstract is the result of the graduate assignment that I submitted to UVM VP Professor Patty Prelock for the partial fulfillment of the course “CSD299A Autism Spectrum Disorder” that I took last year in 2019. My presentation includes results of the literature review on autism in Nepal.

The information from the presentation can be utilized here in the UVM and/or US to develop ideas as to how providers can support the ethnically Nepali community living in Vermont and/or in the US by adopting culturally appropriate comprehensive services.

Abstract:

The history of autism, diagnostic practices and understanding about autism development are limited in Nepal. My presentation will focus on a brief history of autism diagnosis in Nepal, challenge areas such as lack of access and knowledge about autism, tools used for autism studies in Nepal and information for professionals to support this population. There are very few peer-reviewed research articles on autism in Nepal. Most of the available articles do not provide in-depth information on different aspects of autism assessment and intervention. However, some studies in Nepal showed more reliable and generalizable results with the help of adaptation and translation of screening tools, adapting the tools to be administered by low skill health screeners, providing trainings to the screeners, and making sure through pilot projects the adaption and acceptability of the screening tools among the local communities.

What I learned from the review is that health providers in Nepal are not well informed of ASD; so it is obvious that common people definitely are not well informed either. So, it is important to relate the lack of knowledge of ASD assessment and interventions with those people who are resettled here in the US from that country and advocate for the culturally responsive method to support people with a disability and their families. In addition, there are other language and cultural barriers they face here in the new country.

The take away will be that since we have quite a large population base from the ethic Nepali community group with a significant number of family members with disabilities in the US; it is vital to educate and inform our students, experts, professionals, policy makers and related entities to support this community at their best.

Reference:

Khatri, G. K., Onta, S. R., Tiwari, S., & Choulagai, B. P. (2011, August). Knowledge and Management Practices of Paediatricians about Autism Spectrum Disorder in Kathmandu, Nepal. Retrieved April 10, 2019, from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259568219_Knowledge_and_Management_Practices_of_Paediatricians_about_Autism_Spectrum_Disorder_in_Kathmandu_Nepal