Presentation Title

Roadway Reclamation and Base Stabilization Technologies

Project Collaborators

Vermont Agency of Transportation (Collaborator, Client)

Abstract

The reclamation of roadway asphalt or pavement is an emergent technology that uses existing materials for the creation of new roadway surfaces. Reclaimed stabilization base (RSB) is typically prepared with an aggregate, water and a binder, like calcium chloride or cement. In collaboration with the Vermont Agency of Transportation, researchers at the University of Vermont have been working to better understand the physical properties and strengths of RSB materials.

In the first phase of the project, researchers subjected the provided subbase and roadway asphalt pavement (RAP) materials to physical tests to assess soil gradation and composition. In the latter stages, standard cylindrical samples of varying aggregate and binder amounts or types, are being produced, cured and triaxially loaded. Each curing and mixing procedure is adaptive, and varies for typical compounds like cement, emulsion or calcium chloride.

The impact of mix design on sample strength is reflected in the behavior of the specimens, including ultimate strength and ultimate strain, and failure mode. Based on the data obtained, researchers will provide the Vermont Agency of Transportation with recommendations for which materials or combinations of materials work best per project. This determination considers feasibility, replication reliability and the availability of resources. Thus far, samples have been prepared with cement and calcium chloride, but future endeavors will work with other materials.

The poster presentation will feature the work completed so far by the research team, including testing procedures, results and observations. The project is not yet completed, however, will continue to move forward with further testing of new materials.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Ehsan Ghazanfari

Secondary Mentor NetID

jelens

Secondary Mentor Name

John E. Lens

Graduate Student Mentors

Ali Khorasani

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Program/Major

Civil Engineering

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

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Roadway Reclamation and Base Stabilization Technologies

The reclamation of roadway asphalt or pavement is an emergent technology that uses existing materials for the creation of new roadway surfaces. Reclaimed stabilization base (RSB) is typically prepared with an aggregate, water and a binder, like calcium chloride or cement. In collaboration with the Vermont Agency of Transportation, researchers at the University of Vermont have been working to better understand the physical properties and strengths of RSB materials.

In the first phase of the project, researchers subjected the provided subbase and roadway asphalt pavement (RAP) materials to physical tests to assess soil gradation and composition. In the latter stages, standard cylindrical samples of varying aggregate and binder amounts or types, are being produced, cured and triaxially loaded. Each curing and mixing procedure is adaptive, and varies for typical compounds like cement, emulsion or calcium chloride.

The impact of mix design on sample strength is reflected in the behavior of the specimens, including ultimate strength and ultimate strain, and failure mode. Based on the data obtained, researchers will provide the Vermont Agency of Transportation with recommendations for which materials or combinations of materials work best per project. This determination considers feasibility, replication reliability and the availability of resources. Thus far, samples have been prepared with cement and calcium chloride, but future endeavors will work with other materials.

The poster presentation will feature the work completed so far by the research team, including testing procedures, results and observations. The project is not yet completed, however, will continue to move forward with further testing of new materials.