Presentation Title

Uptake of Targeted Activatable Nanoparticles Detecting Reactive Oxygen Species in vitro

Project Collaborators

Jaspreet Singh Nagi (PhD Student)

Abstract

Nanoparticles are not as well understood as they could be--they do pose a potential risk to human health, and how they interact within the body is a concept that still requires extensive research. The focus of our experimental design is going to be on the endothelium and how nanoparticles will be affecting this tissue in flow. The endothelium is the main barrier between any aspect of the circulatory system and remaining tissues within the body; this includes the nanoparticles that could potentially pass through the various routes of exposure. These routes include the skin, the GI tract, and/or injections of nanoparticles. Maintaining a healthy endothelial barrier is crucial for maintaining human health, and any sort of dysfunctions with the endothelial barrier leads to numerous diseases and inflammation. Nanoparticles themselves are known to interact with the endothelium and they also internalize in significant numbers, as previously discovered in the Doiron Lab here at The University of Vermont. Previously published studies from the Doiron Lab have also shown that the function of endothelium is impacted in various ways by nanoparticles, in a particle-specific way. Twenty nanometer particles have shown noticeable effects on the endothelial cells, which has been tested across metallic, polymeric, and ceramic material types. Taking into account what has been done so far, our goal will be to hone in on the effect of nanoparticles on endothelial cells in flow, which is how the cells experience the shear stress that they do in the body. When the equipment comes in, we will be looking at the cell viability, actin alignment, calcium, and the reactive oxygen species. These variables have been chosen because as long as these stay at healthy levels then we can conclude that the nanoparticles are not behaving in a cytotoxic manner. The experimental design will be shared at this conference, as well as any data gathered by the sixteenth.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Amber Doiron

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Program/Major

Biomedical Engineering

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Uptake of Targeted Activatable Nanoparticles Detecting Reactive Oxygen Species in vitro

Nanoparticles are not as well understood as they could be--they do pose a potential risk to human health, and how they interact within the body is a concept that still requires extensive research. The focus of our experimental design is going to be on the endothelium and how nanoparticles will be affecting this tissue in flow. The endothelium is the main barrier between any aspect of the circulatory system and remaining tissues within the body; this includes the nanoparticles that could potentially pass through the various routes of exposure. These routes include the skin, the GI tract, and/or injections of nanoparticles. Maintaining a healthy endothelial barrier is crucial for maintaining human health, and any sort of dysfunctions with the endothelial barrier leads to numerous diseases and inflammation. Nanoparticles themselves are known to interact with the endothelium and they also internalize in significant numbers, as previously discovered in the Doiron Lab here at The University of Vermont. Previously published studies from the Doiron Lab have also shown that the function of endothelium is impacted in various ways by nanoparticles, in a particle-specific way. Twenty nanometer particles have shown noticeable effects on the endothelial cells, which has been tested across metallic, polymeric, and ceramic material types. Taking into account what has been done so far, our goal will be to hone in on the effect of nanoparticles on endothelial cells in flow, which is how the cells experience the shear stress that they do in the body. When the equipment comes in, we will be looking at the cell viability, actin alignment, calcium, and the reactive oxygen species. These variables have been chosen because as long as these stay at healthy levels then we can conclude that the nanoparticles are not behaving in a cytotoxic manner. The experimental design will be shared at this conference, as well as any data gathered by the sixteenth.