Presentation Title

Novel Device for Measuring Lung Function using Oscillometry

Abstract

The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a non-invasive means of measuring lung mechanics. Forced oscillations are delivered to the respiratory system via oscillatory pressure (or flow) with the resultant flow (or pressure) recorded. Information derived from these measurements comes in the form of impedance, which provides insight into the physiologic state of the lung and is dependent on the frequency range over which it was collected. Clinically, these physiologic parameters can be used to evaluate pulmonary pathologies such as asthma and COPD. Standard methods of performing FOT require bulky systems limiting its use outside the clinical setting. Production of a novel device that operates without an external power source would allow real-time measurements of lung function in a wide variety of settings. There are current FDA-approved oscillatory devices, such as the Smith’s Medical Acapella and D R Burton vPEP, which produce pulses of air at various frequencies which could potentially be used to perform FOT. We are hoping to explore the efficacy of these alternate methods in this study. To evaluate this, we performed FOT on healthy individuals without history of lung disease. Three devices were tested including the Flexivent (standard method), the Acapella, and vPEP. Pressure and flow were recorded during multiple breathing maneuvers which was used to calculate impedance. Correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate the three devices. Results and discussion are forthcoming.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr Jason H Bates PhD

Status

Medical Students

Student College

Larner College of Medicine

Program/Major

Health Sciences

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Novel Device for Measuring Lung Function using Oscillometry

The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a non-invasive means of measuring lung mechanics. Forced oscillations are delivered to the respiratory system via oscillatory pressure (or flow) with the resultant flow (or pressure) recorded. Information derived from these measurements comes in the form of impedance, which provides insight into the physiologic state of the lung and is dependent on the frequency range over which it was collected. Clinically, these physiologic parameters can be used to evaluate pulmonary pathologies such as asthma and COPD. Standard methods of performing FOT require bulky systems limiting its use outside the clinical setting. Production of a novel device that operates without an external power source would allow real-time measurements of lung function in a wide variety of settings. There are current FDA-approved oscillatory devices, such as the Smith’s Medical Acapella and D R Burton vPEP, which produce pulses of air at various frequencies which could potentially be used to perform FOT. We are hoping to explore the efficacy of these alternate methods in this study. To evaluate this, we performed FOT on healthy individuals without history of lung disease. Three devices were tested including the Flexivent (standard method), the Acapella, and vPEP. Pressure and flow were recorded during multiple breathing maneuvers which was used to calculate impedance. Correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate the three devices. Results and discussion are forthcoming.