Presentation Title

Almirante Bottlenose Dolphin Whistles

Presenter's Name(s)

Leighanna Nichole TerhuneFollow

Project Collaborators

Laura May-Collado(co-author)

Abstract

Coastal bottlenose dolphins’ populations are small, show high site fidelity, and are vulnerable due to human activities such as boat traffic. Areas with high boat traffic are noisier, and this noise can mask biologically important acoustic signals used by dolphins to find food and to socialize. Here I study the acoustic structure of dolphin’s communicative signals, called whistles in high traffic site in Almirante Bay, in the Archipelago of Bocas del Toro, Panama. Data was collected using autonomous underwater recorders that sampled the soundscape continuously in a 24h cycle. Only high noise-to-signal ratio whistles were analyzed. From each whistle seven acoustic variables were extracted using the sound analysis software RAVEN. The results of this study will contribute to ongoing conservation efforts in the area to regulate boat traffic within important dolphin habitat.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Laura May-Collado

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biology

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Almirante Bottlenose Dolphin Whistles

Coastal bottlenose dolphins’ populations are small, show high site fidelity, and are vulnerable due to human activities such as boat traffic. Areas with high boat traffic are noisier, and this noise can mask biologically important acoustic signals used by dolphins to find food and to socialize. Here I study the acoustic structure of dolphin’s communicative signals, called whistles in high traffic site in Almirante Bay, in the Archipelago of Bocas del Toro, Panama. Data was collected using autonomous underwater recorders that sampled the soundscape continuously in a 24h cycle. Only high noise-to-signal ratio whistles were analyzed. From each whistle seven acoustic variables were extracted using the sound analysis software RAVEN. The results of this study will contribute to ongoing conservation efforts in the area to regulate boat traffic within important dolphin habitat.