Presentation Title

Staphylococcus species and strains are more likely than others to cause chronic mastitis in organic dairy cattle

Presenter's Name(s)

Aliza Miya RosenkranzFollow

Project Collaborators

John Barlow, Caitlin Jeffrey

Abstract

Over 20 species of Staphylococci have been isolated from cases from mastitis in dairy cattle. Staphylococcus aureus is a major mastitis pathogen causing major intramammary infections and was distinguished from the other staphylococci which were grouped together and described as coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) or non-aureus staphylococci. Historically mastitis researchers and veterinarians did not distinguish among the CNS species as causes of bovine mastitis, however, recent data from studies in Europe and the US provide evidence that different CNS species cause varying durations of mastitis infections. The objective of this project was to describe the association between Staphylococcus species and duration of intramammary infection among dairy cattle in organic dairy farms, and to explore the potential distribution of isolate species among chronic and transient infections. Ten organic dairy farms are enrolled as part of Dr. Caitlin Jeffrey’s study of mastitis epidemiology. Bacterial isolates are being collected from cattle milk samples and are being strain typed. A better understanding of the distribution of these Staph. species on organic dairy farms will give insight to the importance of individual species to help in designing better strategies to prevent transmission of pathogenic bacteria and promote beneficial bacteria.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

John Barlow

Graduate Student Mentors

Caitlin Jeffrey

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biological Science

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

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Staphylococcus species and strains are more likely than others to cause chronic mastitis in organic dairy cattle

Over 20 species of Staphylococci have been isolated from cases from mastitis in dairy cattle. Staphylococcus aureus is a major mastitis pathogen causing major intramammary infections and was distinguished from the other staphylococci which were grouped together and described as coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) or non-aureus staphylococci. Historically mastitis researchers and veterinarians did not distinguish among the CNS species as causes of bovine mastitis, however, recent data from studies in Europe and the US provide evidence that different CNS species cause varying durations of mastitis infections. The objective of this project was to describe the association between Staphylococcus species and duration of intramammary infection among dairy cattle in organic dairy farms, and to explore the potential distribution of isolate species among chronic and transient infections. Ten organic dairy farms are enrolled as part of Dr. Caitlin Jeffrey’s study of mastitis epidemiology. Bacterial isolates are being collected from cattle milk samples and are being strain typed. A better understanding of the distribution of these Staph. species on organic dairy farms will give insight to the importance of individual species to help in designing better strategies to prevent transmission of pathogenic bacteria and promote beneficial bacteria.