Presentation Title

Investigating the Protein-Coding Potential of a lncRNA

Presenter's Name(s)

Stella VarnumFollow

Project Collaborators

Bristy Sabikunnahar (Graduate Student Mentor)

Abstract

Study in the field of genetics has identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as a novel class of molecule that participates in cell function in diverse and convoluted ways. The mouse gene U90926 is thought to produce one such lncRNA molecule in activated macrophage cells. Macrophage activation is a key component of the inflammatory response, and is known to influence the onset of autoimmune disorders. My project investigates the protein-coding potential of U90926. Characterization of the molecule(s) produced by this gene will indicate its mechanistic role in regulating macrophage activation. Improved understanding of how this process influences the larger immune response could prompt innovation of new therapies for autoimmune diseases.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dimitry Krementsov

Secondary Mentor NetID

kgodburn

Secondary Mentor Name

Karolyn Lahue

Graduate Student Mentors

Bristy Sabikunnahar

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biochemistry

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

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Investigating the Protein-Coding Potential of a lncRNA

Study in the field of genetics has identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as a novel class of molecule that participates in cell function in diverse and convoluted ways. The mouse gene U90926 is thought to produce one such lncRNA molecule in activated macrophage cells. Macrophage activation is a key component of the inflammatory response, and is known to influence the onset of autoimmune disorders. My project investigates the protein-coding potential of U90926. Characterization of the molecule(s) produced by this gene will indicate its mechanistic role in regulating macrophage activation. Improved understanding of how this process influences the larger immune response could prompt innovation of new therapies for autoimmune diseases.