Presentation Title

Airborne S. aureus Transmission In Poultry

Abstract

The objective of this study is to investigate public health risks associated with backyard chicken ownership and develop safer husbandry practices with local poultry owners. The number of small poultry flocks in the United States is increasing with very little regulation or oversight. While backyard chickens are most often bought as a sustainable feed source, they have the potential to be sentinels of environmental contamination and pose potential risk to both poultry and family. A specific objective of this study is to identify and deduce the commensal and pathogenic potential of airborne S. aureus transmission in backyard poultry. Further goals include quantifying respiratory health risk to humans and investigating the potential for host shifts within Staphylococcus aureus between poultry and humans. By understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance transmission, scientists and families will have better insight to better establish safe husbandry practices in the backyard poultry environment. Long-term outreach efforts will include scientific publication, presentations at local backyard chicken owner meetings, and communication with farmers about improving local biosecurity protocols.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. John Barlow

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Program/Major

Biological Science

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Second Program/Major

Public Health

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Airborne S. aureus Transmission In Poultry

The objective of this study is to investigate public health risks associated with backyard chicken ownership and develop safer husbandry practices with local poultry owners. The number of small poultry flocks in the United States is increasing with very little regulation or oversight. While backyard chickens are most often bought as a sustainable feed source, they have the potential to be sentinels of environmental contamination and pose potential risk to both poultry and family. A specific objective of this study is to identify and deduce the commensal and pathogenic potential of airborne S. aureus transmission in backyard poultry. Further goals include quantifying respiratory health risk to humans and investigating the potential for host shifts within Staphylococcus aureus between poultry and humans. By understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance transmission, scientists and families will have better insight to better establish safe husbandry practices in the backyard poultry environment. Long-term outreach efforts will include scientific publication, presentations at local backyard chicken owner meetings, and communication with farmers about improving local biosecurity protocols.