Presentation Title

Student Research Conference

Project Collaborators

Adrian Wiegman (Graduate student mentor), Dr. Eric Roy (Faculty Advisor)

Time

10 am

Location

Davis Center

Abstract

Wetlands provide a numerous ecosystem services such as flood management, sediment capture, wildlife habitat and recreation (Mitsch et al. 2012). Wetlands have been increasingly valued for carbon (C) sequestration and water quality benefits including nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) attenuation (Mitsch et al. 2014). The State of Vermont and non-profit organizations are currently seeking nature-based solutions (Albert et al., 2017) to meet P reductions required by the EPA’s total maximum daily load (TMDL) for Lake Champlain (US EPA, 2016). However, it is unclear whether such systems are net P sources or sinks, and no prior studies in the basin have specifically investigated the relationship between C sequestration and P retention. This connection is likely important because significant amounts of P can accumulate and be retained in soil organic matter. This project sets out to determine if phosphorus in soil organic matter is stable or potentially releasable. Enzyme activity and ratios of C:P can indicate scarcity of nutrients. My research will investigate how hydrologic setting and organic matter relate to the availability and stability of P in restored riparian wetlands by quantifying pools of C and P, along with enzyme activity. The data produced in this project will be used in ongoing efforts in Dr. Eric Roy’s lab to quantify and model P retention in restored riparian wetlands in Vermont.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Eric Roy

Secondary Mentor NetID

Awiegman

Graduate Student Mentors

Adrian Wiegman

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

Rubenstein School of Environmental and Natural Resources

Program/Major

Natural Resources

Primary Research Category

Engineering & Physical Sciences

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Student Research Conference

Wetlands provide a numerous ecosystem services such as flood management, sediment capture, wildlife habitat and recreation (Mitsch et al. 2012). Wetlands have been increasingly valued for carbon (C) sequestration and water quality benefits including nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) attenuation (Mitsch et al. 2014). The State of Vermont and non-profit organizations are currently seeking nature-based solutions (Albert et al., 2017) to meet P reductions required by the EPA’s total maximum daily load (TMDL) for Lake Champlain (US EPA, 2016). However, it is unclear whether such systems are net P sources or sinks, and no prior studies in the basin have specifically investigated the relationship between C sequestration and P retention. This connection is likely important because significant amounts of P can accumulate and be retained in soil organic matter. This project sets out to determine if phosphorus in soil organic matter is stable or potentially releasable. Enzyme activity and ratios of C:P can indicate scarcity of nutrients. My research will investigate how hydrologic setting and organic matter relate to the availability and stability of P in restored riparian wetlands by quantifying pools of C and P, along with enzyme activity. The data produced in this project will be used in ongoing efforts in Dr. Eric Roy’s lab to quantify and model P retention in restored riparian wetlands in Vermont.