Psychometrics of the INSCI Survey

Presenter's Name(s)

Alyssa A. FalcoFollow

Abstract

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can completely change a person’s way of life. From affecting things such as how they eat, sleep, walk and sometimes even communicate with others, thus making adjusting to their new life extremely challenging (Shepard Center, 2019).

There are 2 domains that are considered important to people who suffer from a spinal cord injury, the health domain that includes motor, sexual and bowl/bladder functions, and the general life domain including health and relationships (Simpson, Eng, Hsieh & Wolfe 2012). Each topic listed above all need to be measured in order for data to be collected. The process by which the data is collected is the focus of my study, which is to evaluate the reliability of the INSCI survey (International Spinal Cord Injury study). This will be done by using a test-retest, measuring internal consistency and performing a test of normality, of the questions asked within the INSCI survey filled out by community-dwelling participants.

I tested the hypothesis stating that there will be a strong internal consistency (>0.70 correlation) as well as a strong test-retest reliability (>0.80 correlation) in the INSCI survey. I predict that some patients will have a poor or inconsistent test-retest, but the majority will have a strong correlation. These predictions are based on factors such as emotion, one of the focuses of the survey, may change on a day to day basis. Therefore, this could result in some variability between the first test and the retest of the survey. Once the data from the study is collected and analyzed and we are informed of the psychometric properties of the survey, there will be revisions to the survey for the future. Then the revised survey will be administered again in 2022.

References

Simpson, L.A, Eng, J.J, Hsieh, J.T.C & Wolfe, D.L. (2012). The Health and Life Priorities of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review. Journal of Neurotrauma, 29, (8).

Shepard Center. (2019). Understanding Spinal Cord Injury [PDF file].

Retrieved from http://www.spinalinjury101.org/details

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Reuben S Escorpizo

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Neuroscience

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Psychometrics of the INSCI Survey

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can completely change a person’s way of life. From affecting things such as how they eat, sleep, walk and sometimes even communicate with others, thus making adjusting to their new life extremely challenging (Shepard Center, 2019).

There are 2 domains that are considered important to people who suffer from a spinal cord injury, the health domain that includes motor, sexual and bowl/bladder functions, and the general life domain including health and relationships (Simpson, Eng, Hsieh & Wolfe 2012). Each topic listed above all need to be measured in order for data to be collected. The process by which the data is collected is the focus of my study, which is to evaluate the reliability of the INSCI survey (International Spinal Cord Injury study). This will be done by using a test-retest, measuring internal consistency and performing a test of normality, of the questions asked within the INSCI survey filled out by community-dwelling participants.

I tested the hypothesis stating that there will be a strong internal consistency (>0.70 correlation) as well as a strong test-retest reliability (>0.80 correlation) in the INSCI survey. I predict that some patients will have a poor or inconsistent test-retest, but the majority will have a strong correlation. These predictions are based on factors such as emotion, one of the focuses of the survey, may change on a day to day basis. Therefore, this could result in some variability between the first test and the retest of the survey. Once the data from the study is collected and analyzed and we are informed of the psychometric properties of the survey, there will be revisions to the survey for the future. Then the revised survey will be administered again in 2022.

References

Simpson, L.A, Eng, J.J, Hsieh, J.T.C & Wolfe, D.L. (2012). The Health and Life Priorities of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review. Journal of Neurotrauma, 29, (8).

Shepard Center. (2019). Understanding Spinal Cord Injury [PDF file].

Retrieved from http://www.spinalinjury101.org/details