Presentation Title

Effects of Exercise Interventions on Quality of Life and Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

Project Collaborators

Reuben Escorpizo (Course coordinator for DPT 495), Nancy Bianchi (Collaborating Mentor, Dana Medical Library), Julia Irons (Collaborating Mentor, Graduate Writing Center)

Abstract

Motivation: Cancer is a debilitating and life-threatening array of diseases that present many health challenges, including cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and reduced quality of life (QoL). These challenges can occur throughout the disease process, become exacerbated during chemotherapy treatment, and persist into survivorship. While there is evidence that exercise can safely help to mitigate these challenges in cancer survivors, there remains a gap as to whether exercise during chemotherapy has both immediate and long-term effects.

Problem Statement: The objective of this review is to identify evidence on exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment and their impact on CRF and QoL.

Methods: Articles were selected using six different electronic databases; Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane, PEDro, CINAHL, and Web of Science (WoS). Studies selected for review measured the impacts of exercise interventions on CRF and QoL for adults undergoing chemotherapy treatment. The quality and level of evidence for each study was assessed using OCEBM and PEDro. Main research results were summarized into recommendations that were graded using OCEBM.

Results: Ten randomized controlled trials were selected for inclusion in this review. The most common range of intervention was 12-16 weeks, and interventions consisted of aerobic training, resistance training, or a combination of the two. Preliminary results show that exercise-based programs were better than usual care at preventing further declines in certain subcategories of QoL and CRF in participants undergoing chemotherapy. One longitudinal study showed that a combined resistance and aerobic exercise program prevented an increase in CRF both during chemotherapy and 2 years post-intervention.

Conclusions: A combined resistance and aerobic training program, implemented early during chemotherapy treatment, can minimize the immediate and long-term burden of CRF and reduced QoL when compared to usual care.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Rebecca Ouellette-Morton

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Physical Therapy

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Effects of Exercise Interventions on Quality of Life and Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

Motivation: Cancer is a debilitating and life-threatening array of diseases that present many health challenges, including cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and reduced quality of life (QoL). These challenges can occur throughout the disease process, become exacerbated during chemotherapy treatment, and persist into survivorship. While there is evidence that exercise can safely help to mitigate these challenges in cancer survivors, there remains a gap as to whether exercise during chemotherapy has both immediate and long-term effects.

Problem Statement: The objective of this review is to identify evidence on exercise interventions during chemotherapy treatment and their impact on CRF and QoL.

Methods: Articles were selected using six different electronic databases; Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane, PEDro, CINAHL, and Web of Science (WoS). Studies selected for review measured the impacts of exercise interventions on CRF and QoL for adults undergoing chemotherapy treatment. The quality and level of evidence for each study was assessed using OCEBM and PEDro. Main research results were summarized into recommendations that were graded using OCEBM.

Results: Ten randomized controlled trials were selected for inclusion in this review. The most common range of intervention was 12-16 weeks, and interventions consisted of aerobic training, resistance training, or a combination of the two. Preliminary results show that exercise-based programs were better than usual care at preventing further declines in certain subcategories of QoL and CRF in participants undergoing chemotherapy. One longitudinal study showed that a combined resistance and aerobic exercise program prevented an increase in CRF both during chemotherapy and 2 years post-intervention.

Conclusions: A combined resistance and aerobic training program, implemented early during chemotherapy treatment, can minimize the immediate and long-term burden of CRF and reduced QoL when compared to usual care.