Presentation Title

Cognitive Deficits in Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Project Collaborators

Sambit Mohapatra (Primary Mentor) Emily Coderre (Co-Mentor)

Abstract

Problem Statement

Electroencephalogram (EEG) has emerged as a potential method for testing mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Most studies are lacking consistency with patients’ post-concussion time frame, and studies investigating the difference between patients with persistent post- concussion symptoms (PPCS) and patients showing no symptoms are limited. The aim of the study is to investigate cognitive deficit in chronic mTBI, at least 3 months post-injury. We will utilize EEG and compare changes in specific brain frequency bands while the cognitive tasks are performed.

Methods

This study plans to include fifteen mTBI participants (with and without PPCS) and fifteen non-head injured controls. Each mTBI participant will complete several questionnaires addressing their history of concussion with any past or present symptoms they may have. Each participant will perform several cognitive tasks while EEG data is collected. The cognitive tasks will include the flanker task and an n-back task, which are known to test executive functions. The EEG data will be analyzed to see how specific frequency bands may differ between the controls and the mTBI participants.

Results

Data collection is ongoing and with anticipated preliminary results in April 2020.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Sambit Mohapatra, PT, Ph.D.

Secondary Mentor NetID

ecoderre

Secondary Mentor Name

Emily Coderre, Ph.D.

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Neuroscience

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Cognitive Deficits in Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Problem Statement

Electroencephalogram (EEG) has emerged as a potential method for testing mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Most studies are lacking consistency with patients’ post-concussion time frame, and studies investigating the difference between patients with persistent post- concussion symptoms (PPCS) and patients showing no symptoms are limited. The aim of the study is to investigate cognitive deficit in chronic mTBI, at least 3 months post-injury. We will utilize EEG and compare changes in specific brain frequency bands while the cognitive tasks are performed.

Methods

This study plans to include fifteen mTBI participants (with and without PPCS) and fifteen non-head injured controls. Each mTBI participant will complete several questionnaires addressing their history of concussion with any past or present symptoms they may have. Each participant will perform several cognitive tasks while EEG data is collected. The cognitive tasks will include the flanker task and an n-back task, which are known to test executive functions. The EEG data will be analyzed to see how specific frequency bands may differ between the controls and the mTBI participants.

Results

Data collection is ongoing and with anticipated preliminary results in April 2020.