Presentation Title

Personality Pathology in Seasonal Affective Disorder

Presenter's Name(s)

Julia M. TermanFollow

Project Collaborators

Kelly J. Rohan

Abstract

Winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a recurrent form of major depressive disorder that occurs in the fall and winter months. Light therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy are two empirically supported treatments for SAD. However, limited research has examined prescriptive and prognostic factors for treatment outcomes in this population. Some research suggests personality pathology may impact treatment outcomes in depression, although reviews produce differing conclusions. The present study will explore the frequency of personality pathology (i.e., personality disorders and traits) using the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III in a sample of individuals with SAD who participated in a randomized clinical trial for light therapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy. We plan to examine if personality pathology predicts treatment outcomes, and if it does, we will explore if treatment type moderates this relationship.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Kelly Rohan

Status

Graduate

Student College

Graduate College

Program/Major

Psychological Science

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

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Personality Pathology in Seasonal Affective Disorder

Winter seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a recurrent form of major depressive disorder that occurs in the fall and winter months. Light therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy are two empirically supported treatments for SAD. However, limited research has examined prescriptive and prognostic factors for treatment outcomes in this population. Some research suggests personality pathology may impact treatment outcomes in depression, although reviews produce differing conclusions. The present study will explore the frequency of personality pathology (i.e., personality disorders and traits) using the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III in a sample of individuals with SAD who participated in a randomized clinical trial for light therapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy. We plan to examine if personality pathology predicts treatment outcomes, and if it does, we will explore if treatment type moderates this relationship.