Presentation Title

More than a scholarship: College and career outcomes of Mitchell Institute Promise Scholars

Presenter's Name(s)

Loren DowFollow

Abstract

The transition into and out of higher education is often challenging for first-generation college students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Variability in the forms of social, cultural, and economic capital first-generation college students possess may contribute to how they navigate these critical transitions. This qualitative study examines the college transitions of 9 Mitchell Institute Promise Scholarship recipients through two phases of interviews: one during college and one post-college. This study contributes to the ongoing interest in ways to increase degree attainment for all students, specifically those from first-generation and low socioeconomic backgrounds. Schlossberg’s theory of counseling adults in transition and Bourdieu’s social reproduction theory are utilized to understand how the capital provided by the Mitchell Institute influences the Promise Scholars’ experiences in higher education and their career outcomes. This study will aid in evaluation of the programmatic efforts of the Mitchell Institute and will improve higher education institutions’ knowledge of the resources socioeconomically diverse students require to have positive college to career transitions.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jason Garvey

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Education and Social Services

Program/Major

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

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More than a scholarship: College and career outcomes of Mitchell Institute Promise Scholars

The transition into and out of higher education is often challenging for first-generation college students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Variability in the forms of social, cultural, and economic capital first-generation college students possess may contribute to how they navigate these critical transitions. This qualitative study examines the college transitions of 9 Mitchell Institute Promise Scholarship recipients through two phases of interviews: one during college and one post-college. This study contributes to the ongoing interest in ways to increase degree attainment for all students, specifically those from first-generation and low socioeconomic backgrounds. Schlossberg’s theory of counseling adults in transition and Bourdieu’s social reproduction theory are utilized to understand how the capital provided by the Mitchell Institute influences the Promise Scholars’ experiences in higher education and their career outcomes. This study will aid in evaluation of the programmatic efforts of the Mitchell Institute and will improve higher education institutions’ knowledge of the resources socioeconomically diverse students require to have positive college to career transitions.