Presentation Title

To Flip or Not to Flip?: The Influence of Individual Cognitive Differences on L2 Russian Acquisition of Verbal Morphology in a Flipped Language Classroom

Presenter's Name(s)

Katie EsserFollow

Abstract

This presentation will report on the results of Katie Esser's Senior Honor Thesis, which aims to measure the interactions between flipped language classroom methodology and learner cognitive capacity in the acquisition of Russian as a second language (L2) in an instructed setting. This work is inspired by previous studies by Kira Gor and Tatiana Chernigovskaya (2001, 2003, 2004) that examine this grammatical feature, but in classrooms where conjugation is taught explicitly through pattern memorization during class time and without a focus on the cognitive variables that may facilitate the process. The current Russian syllabus for the elementary level (001 & 002) at UVM assigns explicit grammar and vocabulary work at home and reserves class time for communication between peers and the instructor. This project focuses on how students in these classrooms acquire Russian verbal morphology, in particular the complex conjugation pattern for present tense, and how the cognitive capacity of individual learners may modulate the acquisition process. Quantitative results from the study's proficiency-based and cognitive testing will be presented.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Guillermo Rodriguez

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Linguistics

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

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To Flip or Not to Flip?: The Influence of Individual Cognitive Differences on L2 Russian Acquisition of Verbal Morphology in a Flipped Language Classroom

This presentation will report on the results of Katie Esser's Senior Honor Thesis, which aims to measure the interactions between flipped language classroom methodology and learner cognitive capacity in the acquisition of Russian as a second language (L2) in an instructed setting. This work is inspired by previous studies by Kira Gor and Tatiana Chernigovskaya (2001, 2003, 2004) that examine this grammatical feature, but in classrooms where conjugation is taught explicitly through pattern memorization during class time and without a focus on the cognitive variables that may facilitate the process. The current Russian syllabus for the elementary level (001 & 002) at UVM assigns explicit grammar and vocabulary work at home and reserves class time for communication between peers and the instructor. This project focuses on how students in these classrooms acquire Russian verbal morphology, in particular the complex conjugation pattern for present tense, and how the cognitive capacity of individual learners may modulate the acquisition process. Quantitative results from the study's proficiency-based and cognitive testing will be presented.