Presentation Title

Macroeconomic Effects of High-Bandwidth Neural Lace Technology and Comparative Policy Considerations

Abstract

In July 2019, Neuralink announced their progress in developing a high bandwidth, implantable, brain–machine interface (BMI). Among many exciting possibilities, the Neuralink project may ultimately address brain disorders and create the potential for a positive artificial intelligence outcome through human symbiosis. Currently, information transfer and human productivity are constrained to an individual’s natural information input and output speeds. At its simplest, this rate of transfer is represented by visual information inputs to the human eyes, and the comparatively slower output of typing, dicating, or writing, which limits the productivity of workers in information-based settings. From a macroeconomic perspective, the possibility for increased worker-machine bandwidth through a BMI applies directly to a radical increase in worker productivity and ultimately economic growth and standards of living. Using the latest bandwidth estimates for information transfer through BMIs, a modifier for worker productivity can be created and modeled. These changes can then be compared to the effectiveness of prospective future policy alternatives and recommendations -- including levels of education investment -- needed to achieve the same outcome on growth and standards of living.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Nathalie G. Mathieu-Bolh

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Economics

Primary Research Category

Social Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Macroeconomic Effects of High-Bandwidth Neural Lace Technology and Comparative Policy Considerations

In July 2019, Neuralink announced their progress in developing a high bandwidth, implantable, brain–machine interface (BMI). Among many exciting possibilities, the Neuralink project may ultimately address brain disorders and create the potential for a positive artificial intelligence outcome through human symbiosis. Currently, information transfer and human productivity are constrained to an individual’s natural information input and output speeds. At its simplest, this rate of transfer is represented by visual information inputs to the human eyes, and the comparatively slower output of typing, dicating, or writing, which limits the productivity of workers in information-based settings. From a macroeconomic perspective, the possibility for increased worker-machine bandwidth through a BMI applies directly to a radical increase in worker productivity and ultimately economic growth and standards of living. Using the latest bandwidth estimates for information transfer through BMIs, a modifier for worker productivity can be created and modeled. These changes can then be compared to the effectiveness of prospective future policy alternatives and recommendations -- including levels of education investment -- needed to achieve the same outcome on growth and standards of living.