Presentation Title

The Social Acceptability of River Conservation Efforts in Vermont’s Upper Missisquoi Watershed

Presenter's Name(s)

Meryl BraconnierFollow

Project Collaborators

Jill Brooks (Collaborating Mentor)

Abstract

The river management practices advocated for by the State of Vermont have shifted considerably over the last 20 years, thus impacting the communities that border waterways (Kline & Cahoon, 2010). This research examines the social dimensions of river conservation efforts in Vermont’s Upper Missisquoi Watershed in an effort to increase understanding of the cultural factors surrounding environmentally-focused initiatives (Stanek & Lovell, 2019). The study area includes the towns of Lowell, Westfield, Troy, and N. Troy. Using mixed qualitative research methods, including participant observation, in-person interviews, and photovisualizations (PVZs) of landscape scenarios, this study uncovers the perceptions and attitudes of landowners and land users in these towns with regards to the waterways that run through their properties and shifting river management practices. The results will assist conservation organizations, like Vermont Land Trust, in their pursuit of community conservation; inform emerging recommendations for river and floodplain restoration in Vermont; and increase understanding on how PVZs can help communicate landscape changes.

Kline, M., & Cahoon, B. (2010). Protecting River Corridors in Vermont1. JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 46(2), 227-236. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2010.00417.x

Stanek, E. C., & Lovell, S. T. (2019). Building multifunctionality into agricultural conservation programs: lessons learned from designing agroforestry systems with central Illinois landowners. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, 1-9. doi:10.1017/S1742170518000601

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Cheryl Morse

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Environmental Sciences

Primary Research Category

Vermont Studies

Secondary Research Category

Food & Environment Studies

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The Social Acceptability of River Conservation Efforts in Vermont’s Upper Missisquoi Watershed

The river management practices advocated for by the State of Vermont have shifted considerably over the last 20 years, thus impacting the communities that border waterways (Kline & Cahoon, 2010). This research examines the social dimensions of river conservation efforts in Vermont’s Upper Missisquoi Watershed in an effort to increase understanding of the cultural factors surrounding environmentally-focused initiatives (Stanek & Lovell, 2019). The study area includes the towns of Lowell, Westfield, Troy, and N. Troy. Using mixed qualitative research methods, including participant observation, in-person interviews, and photovisualizations (PVZs) of landscape scenarios, this study uncovers the perceptions and attitudes of landowners and land users in these towns with regards to the waterways that run through their properties and shifting river management practices. The results will assist conservation organizations, like Vermont Land Trust, in their pursuit of community conservation; inform emerging recommendations for river and floodplain restoration in Vermont; and increase understanding on how PVZs can help communicate landscape changes.

Kline, M., & Cahoon, B. (2010). Protecting River Corridors in Vermont1. JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 46(2), 227-236. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2010.00417.x

Stanek, E. C., & Lovell, S. T. (2019). Building multifunctionality into agricultural conservation programs: lessons learned from designing agroforestry systems with central Illinois landowners. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, 1-9. doi:10.1017/S1742170518000601