Presentation Title

"Where did you get your information?": Phenomenological Research of the Illness Experiences of People with "Pure" O Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Project Collaborators

Deborah Blom (undergraduate thesis advisor) & Jeanne Shea (undergraduate secondary thesis advisor)

Abstract

This thesis project explores whether the ways in which obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is portrayed in the media and described in educational literature might hinder diagnosis for individuals with primarily obsessional (“Pure-O”) OCD, a rarer form of OCD. Through survey and interviews, the proposed research will investigate individuals’ experiences of realizing their condition and accessing effective treatment. It will exam various socio-cultural factors that determine access to resources and how relatively-new internet chat groups, which offer the ability to freely discuss with like-minded individuals, have affected their experience of their illness.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Deborah Blom

Secondary Mentor NetID

jlshea

Secondary Mentor Name

Jeanne Shea

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Anthropology

Primary Research Category

Arts & Humanities

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"Where did you get your information?": Phenomenological Research of the Illness Experiences of People with "Pure" O Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

This thesis project explores whether the ways in which obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is portrayed in the media and described in educational literature might hinder diagnosis for individuals with primarily obsessional (“Pure-O”) OCD, a rarer form of OCD. Through survey and interviews, the proposed research will investigate individuals’ experiences of realizing their condition and accessing effective treatment. It will exam various socio-cultural factors that determine access to resources and how relatively-new internet chat groups, which offer the ability to freely discuss with like-minded individuals, have affected their experience of their illness.