Presentation Title

Modeling Olive-sided Flycatcher Occupancy in the Northeastern United States

Abstract

The Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) is a large flycatcher of boreal forests and wetlands which has experienced significant population declines, especially along the southern edge of their range. As a result, many states in the northeastern United States consider Olive-sided Flycatchers a species of special concern. Despite conservation interest, the cause of declines remains unclear, therefore limiting potential management actions. Previous studies have been undertaken in the northeast to evaluate their populations and habitat relationships, but they have been limited by small sample size. To overcome this issue, we utilized data collected from the citizen science project eBird alongside national land and canopy cover data. These data were then used to model Olive-sided Flycatcher occupancy within the northeastern United States based on available habitat. By identifying habitat associations, we may be able to predict where Olive-sided Flycatchers will be found and the impacts of changes on the landscape, which could be used to inform future studies and management actions.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Allan Strong

Secondary Mentor NetID

jmurdoch

Secondary Mentor Name

James Murdoch

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

Rubenstein School of Environmental and Natural Resources

Program/Major

Wildlife and Fisheries Biology

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

Second College (optional)

Honors College

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Modeling Olive-sided Flycatcher Occupancy in the Northeastern United States

The Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) is a large flycatcher of boreal forests and wetlands which has experienced significant population declines, especially along the southern edge of their range. As a result, many states in the northeastern United States consider Olive-sided Flycatchers a species of special concern. Despite conservation interest, the cause of declines remains unclear, therefore limiting potential management actions. Previous studies have been undertaken in the northeast to evaluate their populations and habitat relationships, but they have been limited by small sample size. To overcome this issue, we utilized data collected from the citizen science project eBird alongside national land and canopy cover data. These data were then used to model Olive-sided Flycatcher occupancy within the northeastern United States based on available habitat. By identifying habitat associations, we may be able to predict where Olive-sided Flycatchers will be found and the impacts of changes on the landscape, which could be used to inform future studies and management actions.