Presentation Title

Investigation of Potential Differential Mitochondrial Membrane Remodeling between Temperate and Tropical Drosophila melanogaster Populations

Presenter's Name(s)

Neel V. Patel, UVMFollow

Project Collaborators

Dr. Brent Lockwood (Thesis advisor), Dr. Emily Mikucki (Post-doc Mentor), Dr. Sumaetee Tangwancharoen (Post-doc mentor), Thomas O'Leary (Graduate Student Mentor)

Abstract

I investigated mitochondrial membrane fluidity between temperate (Vermont, USA) and tropical (St. Kitts) populations of D. melanogaster by subjecting them to development at lab acclimation of cold and warm temperatures. The cold temperature group were reared at 18°C while the warm temperature group were reared at 28°C. Their mitochondrial membrane fluidity was measured as adults after eclosing using the fluorescence probe 1-(4-Trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-Phenyl-1,3,5-Hexatriene p-Toluenesulfonate (TMA-DPH) and fluorescence polarization (FP). I found that while St. Kitts flies had higher mitochondrial membrane rigidity in both treatments, the Vermont flies showed great phenotypic plasticity in being able to be better remodel their mitochondrial membranes.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Brent Lockwood

Secondary Mentor NetID

emily.mikucki, sumaetee.tangwancharoen

Graduate Student Mentors

thomas.oleary

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biological Science

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

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Investigation of Potential Differential Mitochondrial Membrane Remodeling between Temperate and Tropical Drosophila melanogaster Populations

I investigated mitochondrial membrane fluidity between temperate (Vermont, USA) and tropical (St. Kitts) populations of D. melanogaster by subjecting them to development at lab acclimation of cold and warm temperatures. The cold temperature group were reared at 18°C while the warm temperature group were reared at 28°C. Their mitochondrial membrane fluidity was measured as adults after eclosing using the fluorescence probe 1-(4-Trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-Phenyl-1,3,5-Hexatriene p-Toluenesulfonate (TMA-DPH) and fluorescence polarization (FP). I found that while St. Kitts flies had higher mitochondrial membrane rigidity in both treatments, the Vermont flies showed great phenotypic plasticity in being able to be better remodel their mitochondrial membranes.