Presentation Title

Mechanisms of Glial Infiltration

Project Collaborators

Anna Schmoker, Bryan Ballif

Abstract

Long overlooked, glia have emerged as an important neurobiological component, responsible for numerous nervous system functions. For instance, they are essential components of neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, regulation of ion concentrations, and trophic support. While glial interactions with the axon and synapse have been studied more closely, many glial subtypes form contacts with the neuronal cell body, yet the roles of such glia are still unclear. These glial-somal contacts are the focus of our lab. Previous work has found that a neurotrophin, Spz3, is important in maintaining cortex glial morphology (a cell type that normally extends fine processes to wrap neuronal cell bodies). Reduced expression of Spz3 produces globular cortex glia lacking their characteristic fine processes; however, the precise mechanism underlying how these genes affect glial morphology remains elusive. Here we identify Swim as a potential Spz3 binding partner via proteomic methods, and we demonstrate its role in maintaining cortex glial morphology, further suggesting a potential signaling interaction.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Jaeda Coutinho-Budd

Status

Undergraduate

Student College

College of Arts and Sciences

Program/Major

Biological Science

Primary Research Category

Biological Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Mechanisms of Glial Infiltration

Long overlooked, glia have emerged as an important neurobiological component, responsible for numerous nervous system functions. For instance, they are essential components of neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, regulation of ion concentrations, and trophic support. While glial interactions with the axon and synapse have been studied more closely, many glial subtypes form contacts with the neuronal cell body, yet the roles of such glia are still unclear. These glial-somal contacts are the focus of our lab. Previous work has found that a neurotrophin, Spz3, is important in maintaining cortex glial morphology (a cell type that normally extends fine processes to wrap neuronal cell bodies). Reduced expression of Spz3 produces globular cortex glia lacking their characteristic fine processes; however, the precise mechanism underlying how these genes affect glial morphology remains elusive. Here we identify Swim as a potential Spz3 binding partner via proteomic methods, and we demonstrate its role in maintaining cortex glial morphology, further suggesting a potential signaling interaction.