Presentation Title

Behavioral and Neurophysiological Deficits in Adults with Post-Concussion Syndrome: A Scoping Review

Abstract

Background & Objectives: Post-concussion syndrome (PCS) occurs in approximately 30% to 80% of individuals who have experienced a concussion. Currently, diagnosis of PCS relies primarily on patient reported outcome measures which can be subjective with questionable reliability. Adding objective measures such as behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes could improve the diagnosis of PCS and reduce misdiagnosis. The objective of this scoping review was to report deficits identified by various behavioral outcomes (e.g. gait, postural control, neuropsychological measures) and neurophysiological assessment tools (e.g. DTI, MEG, fMRI, EEG) in patients following a concussion.

Methods: A scoping review was conducted on the following search engines: CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, and Web of Science. Included articles used either a behavioral outcome measure or a neurophysiological assessment tool to assess patients following a concussion. Relevant articles (n= 192) were reviewed by five independent reviewers according to our predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Articles that met inclusion criteria (n=90) were discussed in a group format and included in the final analysis.

Results: Results are currently being reviewed and will be available in the 1st week of April 2021.

Primary Faculty Mentor Name

Sambit Mohapatra

Status

Graduate

Student College

College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Program/Major

Physical Therapy

Primary Research Category

Health Sciences

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Behavioral and Neurophysiological Deficits in Adults with Post-Concussion Syndrome: A Scoping Review

Background & Objectives: Post-concussion syndrome (PCS) occurs in approximately 30% to 80% of individuals who have experienced a concussion. Currently, diagnosis of PCS relies primarily on patient reported outcome measures which can be subjective with questionable reliability. Adding objective measures such as behavioral and neurophysiological outcomes could improve the diagnosis of PCS and reduce misdiagnosis. The objective of this scoping review was to report deficits identified by various behavioral outcomes (e.g. gait, postural control, neuropsychological measures) and neurophysiological assessment tools (e.g. DTI, MEG, fMRI, EEG) in patients following a concussion.

Methods: A scoping review was conducted on the following search engines: CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, and Web of Science. Included articles used either a behavioral outcome measure or a neurophysiological assessment tool to assess patients following a concussion. Relevant articles (n= 192) were reviewed by five independent reviewers according to our predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Articles that met inclusion criteria (n=90) were discussed in a group format and included in the final analysis.

Results: Results are currently being reviewed and will be available in the 1st week of April 2021.